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  1. #1
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Questions about APS

    The other day I found a Tix for pretty cheap and it's gotten me somewhat interested in APS format. In stores I've only seen Kodak Advantix film (ISO 200 and 400 I think) and nothing else. I'm almost positive that there is no more B&W or slide film in APS format anymore

    I'm wondering, is it possible to crack open an APS cartridge and respool in 35mm film? Are the films the same size?

  2. #2
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    APS film is narrower and has some punchings and markings, as well as some sort of magnetic stripe -- not sure how important that stuff might be, probably some cameras didn't use all those hooks but I don't know. Even at its peak, I believe there was only one APS slide film and no conventional B&W; that helped cut down on its popularity with more advanced users.

    DaveT

  3. #3

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    You're in Japan, I'm in Australia, but here I buy Fuji Nexia ISO200 APS film easily. I'm guessing it's also available in Japan!

  4. #4
    AgX
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    Last edited by AgX; 04-17-2009 at 06:10 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5

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    You won't be able to attach a 35mm film inside as its too big, and little door on the APS cartridge needs to be kept closed to stop the light getting in, it only opens inside the camera when the film is automatically advanced. Kodak did make a B&W APS film, but wasn't true B&W as it was C-41 processing only. Not sure if you can buy them anymore though.

  6. #6
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Now that it's morning and I'm awake ...

    Here is a shot of APS and 35mm side by side:



    DaveT

  7. #7
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I too wish you could at least get a chromogenic B&W film in APS. Is there any way to process color negative film to be printable onto b&w paper?

  8. #8
    Aurum's Avatar
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    You can print colour film onto B&W paper, if you have a colour head and some filtration, or failing that you are prepared for loooooong exposures onto standard paper. Not ideal but can be done

    (Or scan it and do it that way)
    Last edited by Aurum; 04-17-2009 at 02:30 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: i Kant Spel
    "Flatter Me, and I May Not Believe You. Criticize Me, and I May Not like You. Ignore Me, and I May Not Forgive You. Encourage Me, and I Will Not Forget You."

  9. #9

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    Printing normally processed C-41 film onto B&W paper can produce odd results because most B&W papers aren't sensitive to red light, and of course some of the color negative's image will be defined by red wavelengths. You might still get acceptable results, or it might end up looking weird. Just for the heck of it, I tried printing a photo I took of two people using color film on B&W paper. One person looked OK, but the other had an unnaturally dark complexion in the print, in a way that was very unflattering.

    Kodak used to make a B&W paper for printing from color negatives, but it's no longer available. My understanding is that both Ilford and Oriental still have such products, but I don't recall their names. These papers would all have to be exposed and processed in complete darkness, much like color paper.

    Another approach would be to process the color film using B&W chemicals. That will result in a conventional B&W negative, except that it'll have a dense orange mask. That mask will require longer exposures and perhaps contrast adjustments, but at least you won't be dealing with red information being "lost."

  10. #10
    Aurum's Avatar
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    I've done that myself, but be warned the density of the negs isn't great, and it can be rather grainy. If you want the grain look, its a cheap way to do it
    "Flatter Me, and I May Not Believe You. Criticize Me, and I May Not like You. Ignore Me, and I May Not Forgive You. Encourage Me, and I Will Not Forget You."

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