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  1. #61
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    There are probably better and more modern catalysts. I'll try to get some information.

    PE

  2. #62

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    Hello, I want to start making Ilfochromes again, lately (4 years or so) I´d been wanting to buy chemicals again for Ilfochrome, but I don´t find the P-30 that I used, what can I do? I need to print some 50 11x14 and some 20 16x20 prints. I do not care about the cost, but which chemicals should I buy? I have a Durst Color Processor that has 3 different chemicals batch. Could someone tell me what to do. I would feel so bad if all my Fujichrome slides end up being scanned and printed like a digital Image:-(

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard1500 View Post
    Hello, I want to start making Ilfochromes again, lately (4 years or so) I´d been wanting to buy chemicals again for Ilfochrome, but I don´t find the P-30 that I used, what can I do? I need to print some 50 11x14 and some 20 16x20 prints. I do not care about the cost, but which chemicals should I buy? I have a Durst Color Processor that has 3 different chemicals batch. Could someone tell me what to do. I would feel so bad if all my Fujichrome slides end up being scanned and printed like a digital Image:-(
    Are you in the US? Freestyle can get P30 for you. It's not a web item; you have to call them.

  4. #64

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    Finding Ilfochrome chemicals in Canada

    I live outside of Ottawa, Ontario. Any idea of where I can buy the chemestry for Ilfochrome?

    Thanks, Don

  5. #65

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    I have a feeling that you haven't heard about Ilfochrome discontinuance letters sent out a few weeks ago. This time it seems to be for real.

    http://noringcircus.blogspot.com/201...otography.html
    http://www.aphog.de/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=19218
    http://kodachromeproject.com/forum/s...0&postcount=44

    As I understand it, they are willing to do a final coating IF there's sufficient demand ('sufficient' being undefined) and paper will be available in rolls only. The deadline for orders is end of November 2011, orders can be paid in monthly instalments, and they will store the rolls until Juni 2013. There will also be a 30% price increase.

    Could anybody who received this letter confirm? Can we non-commercial users somehow co-operate and place a significant enough order through a reseller?

  6. #66
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    This is, if confirmed, indeed a royal bummer, it's not like Ilford Switzerland cordially supported Ilfochrome anyways during the last few years. Here's what I plan on doing:
    • Paper can be stored in the freezer for many years according to what I have found in relevant forum postings. So I will stock what I plan on using over the next few years so I can continue to print my favorite slides.
    • Chemistry is more short lived according to these same postings but should last for 1-2 years, at least after heavy color corrections.
    • Chemistry will be either available after that or I will look into home brewing. There are a few threads here on APUG which describe recipes and refer to further info: here and here.

    It's really time for us slide shooters to put our freezers to use and to boost our knowledge in organic chemistry. I've already stocked up on Fuji Astia 100F and, just in case, Kodak E100VS. This should buy me 5 more years before I either convert to C41 and B&W or just give up photography altogether. It was fun while it lasted.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  7. #67
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    The writing has been on the wall for a long time now regarding Ilfochrome; I am not at all surprised it is ending. Realistically, it is pointless grandstanding to suddenly feel the urge to stock up on chems, papers and whatnot and assume you can keep running the process well into the future. That's crystal ball stuff that has been tried many times before by home hobbyists. Make what you have last as long as you can, but don't get bogged down in nostalgia. Move along and transition — analogue to digital; if you do not, all you will have are slides and not a skerrick of skill to manage any processing of them in the post-analogue era, where darkrooms and wet chems had then become a nostalgic era for poignant reflection, rather than treating the coming end of it as a catalyst for change and skilling up so that you can rest assured that so long as film is available you can still make something of it rather than turn your back on photography altogether. That's not something I will be doing with my forward plans, which are analoguous photography and dproduction.

    Let's not forget that Ilfochrome lost legions of dedicated analogue photographers here in Australia with the closure of the last long-term pro-level lab in Adelaide. The exodus away from analogue printing's finest was profound. Of those I know of, all shifted immediately to digital, some retired, others dropped photography, like the mournful tune of the Last Post: a life of dedication to the process wasn't enough to save it, much less a scattering of people around the globe. Time and time again labs were railed by tardiness on the other side of the globe. It's not that Switzerland cared much for deadlines, delivery etiquette, quality control or a litany of other disturbing problems that harried labs working the very expensive Ilfochrome process, such as faulty, scratched, spoilt or unsuitable media. We're probably better off without it now that other processes are getting a serious leg-up on the old bastion of prints. My 320 bespoke 'chromes over 21 years will serve as a lasting reminder of what it was like. But it's time to move on. Like all those similarily disaffected, I am still working in analogue (transparencies) using film cameras, but actively transitioning to alternative process production.
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 10-30-2011 at 08:42 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

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  8. #68
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    Well poo.

    I won't buy any. I had thought about it, but I can't really afford to stock up on large amounts, and I won't get back into a process that won't be around for at least a few years.

    As far as "turning my back on photography" that is EXACTLY what I will do if I can no longer get analog materials for black and white. Tried digital, it's a huge yawn for me. Sure I'll take snapshots but that's it. I'm just not interested, not interested in being interested, not for me, finis. I have plenty of other hobbies.

    Fortunately black and white is my first and real love anyway.

  9. #69

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    With respect Roger, I think most photographers who love colour and I'm one of them have realised by now that it is only a matter of time before digital is the only option available. Black and white is a different story and will probably be around for decades. It also seems, based on what I read on APUG, entirely feasible for individuals or groups to make their own monochrome materials but I am totally unconvinced that the same is true for subtractive multilayer colour materials.

    I still use a little colour negative film, black & white materials and have most of my professional digital colour printed on RA4 paper. But I am firm that as those materials become unavailable, I will switch that component to digital. I will neither hoard materials (apart from a few rolls for their historic value only) nor attempt to manufacture them. First and foremost I am a practitioner of photography - not film or digital photography just photography and it takes the same knowledge and experience to make a good photo irrespective of how the camera captures the image or how it is ultimately reproduced. OzJohn

  10. #70
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    Every single point in this post is correct, the manufacturer in Switzerland let the ball down , plain and simple, I loved the process , loved the prints , but basically could not afford to keep the machine alive, it was a sad day when the scrapper came and took away a perfectly operation cibachrome processor. I ran the last standing commercial Cibachrome lab in Canada, I purchased a special built processor for this product and mastered masking and eventully printed digitally with my lambda. I believe the biggest user of this product today in a single operator situation would be Jeff Wall in Vancouver, but I do not believe he prints for anyone but himself.

    The only ad that I ever saw in any magazine promoting Cibachrome in the last 17 years was a black and white lab ad featuring a print shop that was closed and the owner operator deceased.
    This was not a Ilford UK issue, but rather Ilford Switzerland issue and I do agree that moving on is the right course. For those pinning for the archival aspects of cibachrome , remember that was only the case in dark storage, and with digital negatives looming and prevalent , making tri colour gums and carbons are within everyone heres reach and at a fraction of the cost.


    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    The writing has been on the wall for a long time now regarding Ilfochrome; I am not at all surprised it is ending. Realistically, it is pointless grandstanding to suddenly feel the urge to stock up on chems, papers and whatnot and assume you can keep running the process well into the future. That's crystal ball stuff that has been tried many times before by home hobbyists. Make what you have last as long as you can, but don't get bogged down in nostalgia. Move along and transition — analogue to digital; if you do not, all you will have are slides and not a skerrick of skill to manage any processing of them in the post-analogue era, where darkrooms and wet chems had then become a nostalgic era for poignant reflection, rather than treating the coming end of it as a catalyst for change and skilling up so that you can rest assured that so long as film is available you can still make something of it rather than turn your back on photography altogether. That's not something I will be doing with my forward plans, which are analoguous photography and dproduction.

    Let's not forget that Ilfochrome lost legions of dedicated analogue photographers here in Australia with the closure of the last long-term pro-level lab in Adelaide. The exodus away from analogue printing's finest was profound. Of those I know of, all shifted immediately to digital, some retired, others dropped photography, like the mournful tune of the Last Post: a life of dedication to the process wasn't enough to save it, much less a scattering of people around the globe. Time and time again labs were railed by tardiness on the other side of the globe. It's not that Switzerland cared much for deadlines, delivery etiquette, quality control or a litany of other disturbing problems that harried labs working the very expensive Ilfochrome process, such as faulty, scratched, spoilt or unsuitable media. We're probably better off without it now that other processes are getting a serious leg-up on the old bastion of prints. My 320 bespoke 'chromes over 21 years will serve as a lasting reminder of what it was like. But it's time to move on. Like all those similarily disaffected, I am still working in analogue (transparencies) using film cameras, but actively transitioning to alternative process production.



 

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