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  1. #1

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    Maximum Acceleration Speed Possible with Fuji Astia 100?

    First post on APUG!

    I am looking to get in to film acceleration, for which I hear the Ektachrome 200 film is best, or maybe Fuji 400.

    Unfortunately, I only have some older Astia 100 lying around.

    I am hoping to get at least E.I. 5,000 out of it. . . Is this realistic at 40 min. at 75° Fahr. (24°C)?

    Also, I note that the C-41 bleach is not optimal, rather the ferricyanide/bromide variety is better for "optimal" results.

    Does anyone know if the 8- & 12g or 30- and 10g varieties of ferricyanide & bromide bleach, respectively, per liter, are better for this purpose?

  2. #2
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I believe the maximum attempted push is about 3 stops, which is asa 800. You're looking at very high contrast and coarser grain. You can try more if you really want.

    If you want to do this correctly buy a Kodak 5 Liter E6 kit. Ferricyanide bleaches don't agree with the dyes in modern color films. 75 degrees is also asking for hell, you should heat it up to 100. If you do try 75 degrees you're looking at VERY long times.

  3. #3

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    No, there are examples going back to the early '70s with Ektachrome 200 pushed up to 10,000.

    One is a train at night, at a shutter speed fast enough to stop it's motion.


    And, just to clarify, I'm not looking for crazy, wonky looking colors; I am doing this to attain the maximum possible film speed. I've no desire for crazy looking stuff that is much easier, cheaper, and more controllable digitally.
    Last edited by Karl_CTPhoto; 05-26-2009 at 05:53 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4

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    Well, how long does it take to develop an E6 film to completion (in the first developer), and how many stops of a push does that represent? That would be the maximum theoretical push, and the results would probably be very weird. E.I. 5000 or 10000 from a 100 or 200 speed film sounds totally unrealistic to me. Can you show some of those examples?

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl_CTPhoto View Post
    No, there are examples going back to the early '70s with Ektachrome 200 pushed up to 10,000.
    This is most like not achieve just through processing but with special Hyper-sensitisation prior to exposure. You could look up how film speeds were accelerated for Astronomy as this was the major area where these techniques were used. Michael Maunder in the UK specialised in this area his company is Speedibrews, he has a website.

    Ian

  6. #6

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    Sorry for the delay in replying back.

    No, I am 100% positive it was E200 ('70s version) with nothing else done, just film acceleration.

    I have the article scanned but, frankly, am unwilling to pay to post it here.

    Can I e-mail it to you?

    Can someone else here post a scan if I were to e-mail it to them?

  7. #7

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    I have recently been playing around with film acceleration the best results so far has been with sensia400 @3200, so 3 stops and I suspect anymore would result in not much of an image. Also you will get a colour shift with slide film in c-41 but how much depends on how you scan it.
    I've had better results with using a c-41 developer first rather than B+W.

  8. #8
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Is film acceleration the same thing as push processing?
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  9. #9

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    In a word no.. should be a first development in B+W or colour, stop and fix, then a time in rehal bleach before redevelopment this can be looped to increase the effect, then to finish normal bleach, fix stab.
    It might also be called intensification/amplification i'm not sure which.

  10. #10
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benOM View Post
    In a word no.. should be a first development in B+W or colour, stop and fix, then a time in rehal bleach before redevelopment this can be looped to increase the effect, then to finish normal bleach, fix stab.
    It might also be called intensification/amplification i'm not sure which.
    This is not film acceleration, it is rehal processing or amplification. But then it is not amplification in the strictest sense.

    This method will not get you higher speed, just higher contrast in most cases.

    Push processing of reversal films does not increase speed actually, it decreases Dmax thereby giving the illusion of increased speed in normal density areas at the sacrifice of worse color, grain and contrast.

    PE

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