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  1. #11
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Well I am only going to use these for quick work and will probably throw away the negs after anyway. I do always use Kodak.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    Well I am only going to use these for quick work and will probably throw away the negs after anyway. I do always use Kodak.

    good luck, and I hope it's not crappy film

  3. #13
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Check grain, color fidelity, sharpness and dye stability. For the latter you will need about 20 years for it to be valid, but by then, who cares. You saved some $$$.

    I remind you that Kodak and Fuji have the cutting edge dye stability technology. All dyes fade, but theirs fade more slowly than anyone else's dyes. Ilfochrome is a print material and another case entirely.

    So, go ahead. Save $$$ on pictures taken with an expensive camera. With other color films, they may not last. IDK.

    PE
    You can rely on internal tests of Kodak's own and their competitors' films.
    But where are public figures of independant tests of recent(!) films to be found? I have not come across such.

  4. #14
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    AFAIK, there are no reliable independant tests.

    Since this is not a Kodak film, I have no idea what it may be like. I had good results with a late run of Agfa color, but some earlier films did not keep well pre-exposure.

    PE

  5. #15

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    if you want to see what the stuff is like before committing $30 to it......you can usually Solaris film loaded in $1 store disposable cameras. Obviously image quality dependent on the lens won't be up to your normal standards, but you'll get to see the huge grain and horrible colors.

  6. #16
    mts
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    OK, I recently tried some of this film that I have noticed for several years in the FreeStyle product lists. My result applies only to my own scratch-mix C41 clone chemistry, with the caveat that the chemistry works beautifully on Kodak and Fuji C41 films. I tried to get a usable negative by extending development time to 6 minutes for images exposed at ASA 100, but to no avail. To get decent images I had to expose at ASA 50 and extend the developer time to 4 minutes. Images exposed at ASA 100 simply don't reach threshold at the toe of the curves. The shadows are empty.

    Arista is not going to be my choice for CN film, ever. In my opinion, FreeStyle isn't doing anybody a service by selling this film. Years ago I used 3M film and some other cheap C41 store brands and got acceptable results from all of them. Arista 100 images exposed at ASA 50 are somewhat better and development time can be reduced to perhaps 4 minutes to get a usable negative, but the film does not appear to have large dynamic range.

    On the plus side, the film is easy to bleach and fix. Arista negatives begin to clear when the fixer bottle is brought near the tank. I suspect the reason being that Arista 100 contains minimum silver halide in its emulsion (read cheap for that). Of course with little silver halide it is difficult to produce decent dye concentrations leading to empty shadows.

    With so much really good film available I have no idea why anyone would try to economize with Arista film. Kodak Gold 200 is cheap also and is far better for the average user. Perhaps the Arista result might be different with official C41 processing, but I doubt that the results are going to be acceptable for anyone who is the least bit discriminating.

    Certainly for someone starting out in color work I cannot recommend this Arista 100 film. Buy Kodak Gold and learn with a product that is proven. If I can get some decent images from Arista I will post a negative scan or two.
    Last edited by mts; 07-07-2009 at 01:01 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: added developer pH 10.2, a little on the hot side for C41
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  7. #17
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    wow this sounds interesting is it made in 120?

    *

  8. #18
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Nope. Only 35mm.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    Hello- Has anyone ever worked with the Aristicolor Print 100 film from Freestyle? I need some 12 exposure rolls for my photo club and they seem to be the only option. Does anyone know what brand of film this actually is? Thanks
    Patrick
    I have used the 400 from time to time. The film is (was) Ferrania formerly known as Imation formerly known as 3M formerly known as Ferrania.

    I understand that ferrania has closed their film production as of the end of 2008. Freestyle only shows broken lines of the Arista now, they used to have 12, 24 and 36 exposures of 100, 200, and 400 ASA as well as 100Ft bulk rolls.

  10. #20
    mts
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    Here are two samples of negative scans from Arista 100 that was exposed at ASA 50 and processed 3.5 min in my scratch-mix C41. Processing time in the developer was 3.5 min at pH 10.2. The negative Dmax is a little light and the saturation is low. Both exposures were made with Minolta 7000 auto settings using a Minolta 28 mm lens. The MacBeth chart picture is about 1/3 of the entire negative, and the St. Michael Mtns. picture is a full frame scan. Both images are flat sunlight illumination.

    The negative scans were made using Nikon 9000 ED auto settings. The scan brightness was adjusted down about 10% with PS to yield these images. Arista film might be acceptable to some who plan only to scan, but certainly it's not likely to be acceptable for printing. With such low saturation it will be very difficult to make acceptable prints, in my opinion. On the other hand, because the film is advertised as inexpensive for students, it might be just the thing to use for learning. If you are able to make good prints from these negatives then you probably have pretty much mastered color printing.

    Saturation might be improved somewhat by rating the film at ASA 25 and reducing development time to say 3 minutes, but the contrast isn't very good as it is at ASA 50, and will suffer further by shortening development time or increasing the developer pH. I am just guessing when I conclude the film simply doesn't have enough silver content to yield good color saturation. The color balance doesn't appear too bad, but one cannot really compare with the really excellent films that are in today's market.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Arista-100-ASA-50-C41-3.5-m.jpg   St.-Michael-Mtns.jpg  
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

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