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  1. #1

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    Suppliers of VERY cheap 35mm color E6 and ECN2 negative film.

    Suppliers of 35mm Short Ends and Recans.
    I have no association with any of these companies.

    Most of the film is very inexpensive negative film that is processed using the ECN2 process.

    Some E6 film (#5285) is available as well! At only 15c/ft (Film emporium is one of the few that quote prices online, others usually require an e-mail. http://www.tapesuperstore.com/kodak35mmfilm2.html).

    Australia:
    Sound and Vision Stock Shop
    http://www.steadisystems.com/

    Canada:
    Certified Film
    http://certifiedfilm.com/

    Stock Options
    http://www.stockoptionscorp.com/

    Germany:
    Film X change
    http://www.filmxchange.de/?pid=27

    USA:
    Film Emporium
    http://www.tapesuperstore.com/kodak35mmfilm2.html

    Raw-Stock
    http://www.raw-stock.com/recans.html

    Film Source LA
    http://www.releasing.net/rawstock/

  2. #2
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Is there any problem using this as still film? I thought motion film had some kind of backing on it? I mean, at Film Emporium I can buy 100ft or about 18 rolls of Ektachrome for $15. There must be a catch here.
    f/22 and be there.

  3. #3
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    ECN-2 film requires the ECN-2 process and it does have a backing. I don't believe the ektachrome reversal films do though. They do have different shaped sprocket holes but they should work in still cameras.

  4. #4
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    If the ektachrome doesn't have weird backing, I'm buying some. Heck for $15 it's almost worth buying 100ft to find out.

    I would have to bulk-load it though. Bulk loading B&W isn't a problem because I process it myself, but since I have to send E-6 out through the mail for processing, I'm not sure what I'd do for cartridges. My usual reloaded mini-lab cartridges probably wouldn't be popular with Dwaynes, both because they would be labeled as C-41 and because the DX coding would probably be wrong, not to mention it would be taped to the spool with masking tape. If I bought commercial reload-able cartridges, would Dwayne's send them back with the film?
    f/22 and be there.

  5. #5

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    I've used these film shorts in the long, long-ago past with decent success. But I seem to recall that it was only processable using specialized process/machinery. Does this fact from the Kodak FAQ indicate that there might be a problem having the 5285 processed in a "normal" E-6 machine?

    Q: How do I process this stock? Where do I process this stock?

    A: This stock is intended for process in E6 chemistry - cine machines only. The cine machines are the only ones fast enough to process this film with any speed and efficiency (>10 feet/min). With large tanks, they are also the most stable and consistent of all the E6 processors, performing to the same uniformity specifications as most ECN or ECP machines. Other, slower machines may be found around the country, but caution is advised when dealing with these less robust systems. Please find a list of professional labs recommended for use with this film here.

  6. #6
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    If you ask me, E6 should be E6. It sounds to me like they are saying that processing hundreds of feet of motion film in small labs equipped for still film could cause consistency problems, but they don't say anything about it having a backing or anything.
    f/22 and be there.

  7. #7

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    They do mention odd, but allegedly harmless, discoloration of the processing chemistry. Could this be the backing they didn't overtly mention?

  8. #8
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I've worked with the anti-halation backing. This ruins chemistry if it's run though it unintentionally. It's dark black carbon like and will embed itself in the emulsion permanantly if given the oppurtunity. It's not part of that film.

    The reason it says that is because when you're a cinematographer and you've shot 4000 feet of film, dip and dunk machines are less practical.

  9. #9

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    The Kodak manuals on ECN2 processing can be downloaded FREE at:
    http://motion.kodak.com/US/en/motion...line/index.htm

    There are 15 PDF manuals with formulas etc.

    Emulsion.

  10. #10

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    A couple of years ago I bought some short ends of 5222 and 5231 (Double-X and Plus-X respectively) from Certified Films in Toronto, and the person I dealt with was prompt and effecient. If I ever get around to actually shooting them, I'd definitely consider buying from them again. The prices are definitely right, and being in Canada saves me a whole lot of customs and shipping hassle.
    i can't wait to take a picture of my thumb with this beautiful camera.

    - phirehouse, after buying a camera in the classifieds

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