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  1. #1
    snaggs's Avatar
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    Kodak film with Vision 3 tech?

    I've just bought a Coolscan 5000 and are getting silverfast which comes with a transparency for Kodak (its $100 more for a Fuji one).

    So I was thinking I might start shooting more Kodak neg and E6.

    Whats the best for ISO100 conditions? How does it compare to Sensia?

    Daniel.

  2. #2
    E76
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    I'm not exactly sure what you're asking in this thread, but the only color film designed for stills making use of the Vision 3 technology is Ektar 100, which by all accounts is an excellent, super fine grained color negative film.

    As for the "best" ISO 100 Kodak slide film, that really all depends. All of them (E100G, E100GX, E100VS, and EPP) are good films, and the best way to determine which will be best for your needs is to try them! E100GX is a warm version of E100G, and E100VS is probably most similar to Velvia. EPP also has extra saturation, but if I recall correctly the grain of E100VS is finer. More information can be found on Kodak's website.
    Last edited by E76; 06-08-2009 at 01:13 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added Link

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by E76 View Post
    As for the "best" ISO 100 Kodak slide film, that really all depends. All of them (E100G, E100GX, E100VS, and EPP) are good films, and the best way to determine which will be best for your needs is to try them! E100GX is a warm version of E100G, and E100VS is probably most similar to Velvia. EPP also has extra saturation, but if I recall correctly the grain of E100VS is finer.
    I would not say that E100VS is similar to Velvia. Although they are both considered 'high saturation' films, the look of E100VS is quite different from Velvia. In particular, E100VS tends to be a MUCH warmer film than Velvia (which is typically the case for Kodak vs Fuji). EPP is actually an older emulsion from the 1980s. Unlike the newer Ektachromes, it is a traditional emusion (non T-grain). So it tends to be on the grainier side than, say, E100VS. Saturation is higher with EPP than E100G, E100GX, or EPN. But it is certainly not as 'over the top' as Velvia or E100VS. This kind of puts it in a rather unique position, as there are really no films out there today that feature moderate levels of saturation (except maybe Kodachrome 25, but that has long been discontinued).

  4. #4
    snaggs's Avatar
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    Which is the newest Ektar 100? Surely, if it was released before Vision 3, its not going to have all the advancements?

    Daniel.

  5. #5
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    Which Vision 3 technology benefits are you looking for? Ektar 100 is an entirely new product released quite recently, I only found it for sale locally (SA) last week, but it was available in the US some months ago. The Portra lines have been improved several times in recent years. Portra and Ektar are the most modern colour negative emulsions on the market.
    As I understand it no new R&D is going into Colour Slide as far as Kodak is concerned, or at least none has for some time.
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
    Blog thing!.

    Worry less. Photograph more.

  6. #6
    Mark Antony's Avatar
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    I think the new Ektar 100 uses technology derived from Vision 2 series of films called two electron sensitization. I think vision 3 uses new dye technologies to give smoother colour but I can remember where i read this.
    I think we will see quite a bit of Vision tech in future Kodak films and that is proof Kodak are investing in the future of film.

    The current Ektar film is an advanced film with fine grain and good colour and latitude, sure its human nature to want more but I think you should try that film along with the excellent Portra range which has had constant tweeking by Kodak to make it a very good film.

  7. #7

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    The Kodak transparency you got with your scanner is a certified calibration tool. It is used to set up a profile for the scanner. The resulting profile works quite well for any color film - Kodak or Fuji, positive or negative. There may be some very minor advantages to using the Fuji calibration transparency for Fuji film (after all, Fuji and Kodak dyes are different), but for all practical purposes, the Kodak calibrator works fine. As for using Kodak films, give them a try. They are excellent. But people often develop a style for a certain brand of film, and a new brand may need some experience and adaptation.

  8. #8
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    Kodak has 2 new technologies that they described for Ektar and Portra films.

    1. Vision 2 and Portra (to date) used 2 electron sensitization which gave about 1 stop more in speed for the same grain or better grain at the same speed as an older emulsion.

    2. Vision 3 and Ektar as I understand the change is the use of T-Grain + cubic technology in a given layer to further improve speed and grain. See the Kodak announcements on this. They give a short descriptin of the blended grains. This will probably move into the Portra products soon.

    3. New couplers which eliminate all need for formalin stabilization.

    Some of this has migrated into the B&W products that were recently introduced.

    None of the above, AFAIK, has been introduced into the E6 product line due to the very low sales. The improvements in negative products are all driven by the motion picture market.

    In the early days, Kodak used to give away a calibration negative with every copy of their color dataguide book.

    PE

  9. #9
    snaggs's Avatar
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    I just read this review;

    http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/menu_technic_ektar100.htm

    It seems that Ektar 100 is no finer in grain than Velvia 100?

    Daniel.

  10. #10
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    Please note that in the review, the Fuji film is much lower in color contrast. This will bias all results in the direction of better grain for the Fuji film.

    Also, statements in the review are a bit off showing a lack of understanding of color systems.

    An example is the statement that the negative is limited to orange-red while the positive shows a full gamut of color. This is totally wrong! Another is the observation that the grain in the blue layer is higher than in the other layers. The blue, in normal design, is allowed to be higher in grain for technical reasons and due to the fact that human perception of yellow grain and sharpness is lower than any other color. So, the report is flawed but does show some very good data overall.

    It has taken me some time to decide to make these comments which I read when the report was originally posted.

    Film quality can only be compared when the following are equal: Speed, contrast and color saturation. Then, one may compare: sharpness, grain and resolution among others. If there is a mismatch, then one can mistake higher color saturation or contrast for improved sharpness or for worse grain.

    PE

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