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  1. #21

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    PE,

    The AGFA process 44 (E6 equivalent) 7 bath kit I have uses Formalin in the final rinse.

    Tom.

  2. #22
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    So, I should get some Kodak pre bleach to use before the blix in the Arista kit, and then make sure to use the photo flo in the final wash? In that case, it still is not using the stabilizer?

    Could I use Kodak Pre-bleach after the Blix? I'm assuming that the stabilizer contains formalin, and so that using pre-bleach after blix is just like using stabilizer?
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
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    RIP Kodachrome

  3. #23
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    EA;

    Prebleach means PRE. After is AFTER. Got that? Sorry to be emphatic but the English here is rather explicit.

    If you cannot follow those instructions then make a stabilizer of about 10 ml of 37% formalin in regular Photo Flo 200 and use that as a final rinse.

    Tom;

    Agfa follows the original E6 specs before Formalin was banned in final rinses.

    PE

  4. #24
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    So I finally finished scanning the last rolls from my 30 roll batch in Arista chemistry. First, I need to correct, I used the 1 quart, not the 1 pint chemistry...my bad. Secondly, the last batches suffer from incomplete development and are about 2 stops underdeveloped in the highlights and 3 to 4 in the mids and shadows. I also found out about Fuji positives needing more time...a little too late, that didn't help. So looking back at the whole result, I wouldn't go much more than doubling the Arista recommendation or 16 rolls from a 1 quart batch.
    This is from the 2nd to the last run. 4x5 on Velvia 50. Fortunately, the Tetons aren't going anywhere...:rolleyes:

    Link to 1000 pixel version

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    EA;

    Tom;

    Agfa follows the original E6 specs before Formalin was banned in final rinses.

    PE
    'banned' or removed from the current E6 specification?

    Tom.

  6. #26
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    Tom;

    That depends on what country you are dealing with. Some prohibit its use outright and others do not. Kodak adopted the approach that they wanted to remove it across the board. It took time to achieve.

    There is a lawsuit in Australia over aldehyde hardeners in processes that stemmed from medical X-Ray as one example of outright bans on usage. The work started in the 60s and is ongoing to the present from what I can see. It is interesting to see if the engineers win the race with digital. If color film is around long enough, I suppose there will no longer be any formalin in any process. Kodak stopped using it as a hardener in the 60s in film and paper products.

    E6 still uses formalin in the sense that it is present in the pre-bleach, but not in the stabilzer/final rinse. C41 has no formalin whatsoever.

    PE

  7. #27

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    I just purchased the Arista 1qt kit. this information was useful..but I'm still wondering about the 're-exposure' to light? How long do I re-expose, what wattage light, etc? Apparently, (and i keep seeing this in apug forums) i'm eventually going to have to buy the kodak or fuji chemicals and just mix small batches. These kits, from unicolor to digibase to arista seem to be intensely problematic and sketchy at best where the blix and chemicals are concerned. problem is....the initial investment.

  8. #28
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    I've done as little as holding the film indoors with a typical household light bulb turned on for a few seconds (100w effective tungsten/incandescent), to as much as 30 seconds out in the sunlight (also done several minutes indoors, but thats much less than direct sun

    You can radically lower the cost significantly by using parts rather than whole kits.. at least here... can get much more chemicals for lower cost than a C-41 kit or E-6 from Tetenal (~$83 for 1L kit, $176 for 5L kit for E-6, 5L Kodak E-6 single use kit is $162). But I mix and match parts between Kodak and Fuji, and even Agfa, sometimes mix my own bleach and first dev. It radically lowers the cost significantly (for C-41 as well), at least over here, get a lot more for the same cost as a Tetenal kit etc.

    Of course, caveat emptor before you do that.
    Last edited by Athiril; 10-23-2010 at 03:20 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29
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    Kodak no longer gives light reversal instructions in any literature. However, if you can find E4, E3 or E2 instructions they give detailed re-exposure procedures that are still valid.

    Here is what I found in an E2 pamphlet from about 1955. Expose each side of the film for 5 seconds to the light of a #2 photoflood lamp placed 1 foot from the film. It cautions you to avoid splashing the bulb because it may shatter.

    PE

  10. #30
    mts
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    Instead of a photoflood I use a 150W exterior reflector lamp--the ones designed for use in outdoor fixtures--and use about 30 sec on each side of the Nikkor reel turning it all the time, also 1 foot or less from the lamp. Splashing isn't a problem because these lamps are designed to work in inclement weather. Anyway, the procedure has always worked well for me. I have an outdoor light fixture mounted over the darkroom sink where I process films. I haven't had any shadowing problems by leaving the film in the reel. Bright light bounces all around quite well.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

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