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  1. #51
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    Just before the Polaroid lawsuit was settled, Kodak was working on a slide film (really a 'lantern slide') and projector. It was peeled from the picture unit (like the Trimprint film) and there were plastic slide holders to hold the film. To the best of mu knowledge, it never hit the market (although there were external trade trials). Loosing the Polaroid lawsuit ended the product.

    A year or so after leaving Kodak, I was invited to visit Polaroid. I had an hour (or so) discussion with a senior manager about to retire and we swapped stories about projects. When I mentioned the transparency film and projector, he went over to a cabinet and pulled out a small projector and asked "Like this?"; it turns out Polaroid also worked on such a product.
    But Kodak made an instant slide film (photo in post #47 ). Which format had the intended one you are refering to?

    Polaroid did made 35mm instant slide films (color an monochrome). What kind of slide material had you been shown?

  2. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    But Kodak made an instant slide film (photo in post #47 ). Which format had the intended one you are refering to?
    It never really hit the US/Canada market because of the lawsuit loss - the hardware (projector and camera) was made in Germany and perhaps it did reach the market in Europe, IDK. BTW, the product was really designed to make lantern slide type slides of charts and such, rather than pictorial photography.

    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Polaroid did made 35mm instant slide films (color an monochrome). What kind of slide material had you been shown?
    This was a instant print sized product - one shot at a time. Polaroid had made a larger sized B&W lantern slide instant material for years (I remember selling it in the late 1950's) based on the old B&W peel apart product.

  3. #53
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    Polaroid did make and sell a lantern slide material. I have several 2x3 slides here that I used in talks. I took photos of the computer screen. Polaroid and Kodak made "muffs" that fit on a camera and then over a video screen for taking photos. I had one of those in my office for quite some time to make photos of graphs and charts from good old Lotus! Kodak at that time made prints, but the Polaroid product made slides.

    I believe I still have a dried up expired box of the Polaroid stuff here somewhere.

    PE

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    Yup, the judge (in Boston) decided the case on the basis of a 'concept patent' - instant photography - and not on the actual technologies used. I had an acquaintance who was a Xerox patent lawyer, and he strongly supported the 'concept patent' approach.
    I don't oppose the idea of a 'concept patent', to a degree. But Polaroid brought the concept to market in 1948! How the hell long should they have been protected?
    How things have changed. Nowadays come up with a new concept and a product, and people in China are ripping it off in no time, and getting away with it, unless you fight them all with no help from Uncle Sam.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #55
    AgX
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    Actually it was not even Land/Polaroid who brought that concept to market.




    The history behind the silver-halide-diffusion

    1857 B. Lefévre
    1898 R.D. Liesegang
    1938 André Rott (Gevaert) B.P. 614,155 / 1939
    1941 first commercial product ( “Transargo”, Gevaert)(two sheets)
    1941 Edith Weyde (I.G. Farben /Agfa) D.R.P. 887,733 and US Pat. 2,875,052 (noble metals as nuclei)
    4 mono-sheet processes (The receptive layer is positioned between the base and the negative; after development the obsolete negative layer is taken off.):
    1942 air-reconnaissance film, Agfa
    1942 “Veriflex”, Agfa
    1947 “Diaversal”, Gevaert
    1947(?) “Contargo”, Gevaert
    1947 André Rott (Gevaert) US P. 2,665,986 1947 (where he describes silver-halide-diffusion yielding mono- and tri-chromatic positive images)
    1947 Edwin H. Land (Polaroid) US P. 2,698,238 (lead sulphide, cadmium, lead and zinc salts as nuclei) this patent can be used as cooking book. In the Neblette, 7ed. Land describes a lot of the problems he had to overcome in precipitating the silver


    Both, Edith Weyde from Agfa in Germany and André Rott from Gevaert in Belgium independently reinvented in a way a principle described even in the 19th century.

    So both, Agfa and Gevaert, made products out of the ideas from their chemists. But with the exception of this reconnaissaance film only office instant copy materials. Strange enough both companies seem not to have envisaged more potential in the meaning of a consumer camera film. (Circumstances in Europe were discouraging too.)

    It needed Edwin Land to do so.
    Last edited by AgX; 11-22-2012 at 03:36 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #56

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    I hope its okay to ask here?

    My mother volunteers in a charity shop and they have an EK8 and its box and want to know how much it is worth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kokoro View Post
    I hope its okay to ask here?

    My mother volunteers in a charity shop and they have an EK8 and its box and want to know how much it is worth.
    The EK8 was made in Germany and was the top of the line offering of the first generation of Kodak instant cameras; I don't believe it was sold in the US. Later, there were cameras (also folding cameras like the EK8 and also made in Germany) sold as the Kodamatic 9XX cameras; they were designed for the faster film and featured a fill-flash mode. Picture quality was very nice.

    As for your question 'how much is an EK8 worth?', the answer is not very much. Some people may be interested in buying one to put on a shelf as a decoration. Since you say the box is included, you might start at $10 US and see what happens.
    Last edited by Prof_Pixel; 11-22-2012 at 06:23 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    As for your question 'how much is an EK8 worth?', the answer is not very much. Some people may be interested in buying one to put on a shelf as a decoration. Since you say the box is included, you might start at $10 US and see what happens.
    Thanks. I will tell them.

  9. #59
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    The Edith Weyde work was considered a hallmark in instant imaging!

    Land had many problems which he contracted out to EK for solution. Most people do not know this.

    Land's concept patent in the lawsuit with EK was not his original peel apart but rather his color integral material sold as SX70. The patents and therefore "concept" were still valid at the time of trial. The original SX70 was made and coated by EK as Land could not make it in his own factory.

    I was able to have a reasonably lengthy discussion with Land at a conference here in Rochester a few years before he died. I can't remember a single thing from that, but I do remember his presentation on glassless 3D imaging.

    PE

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    Just an update from TIP they responded to my question with regards to manufacturing the 800/Ace film type from Fuji:

    "Impossible Customer Service, Nov 22 16:31 (CET):

    hello johnnie,
    thank you for your reply and your suggestion.
    we would love purchasing these production machineries but unfortunately we do not have the financial resources.
    with kind regards,"

    Is there now way possible to get funding in order to purchase the required machineries surely someone can quantify the market value and determine if the investment would be worthwhile? Until such time it seems there is no other alternative.

    Thanks

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