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  1. #1
    marsbars's Avatar
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    Kodak Instant film

    Was looking through some old pictures that my mom got from my grandmother. And I found some old polaroid but they were labeled Kodak Instant film. These pictures were dated mid seventies. How long ago was this product discontinued? I have never heard of it and was just curious.
    "There is something about the mystery
    of what is on a roll of film that keeps
    me shooting, none of that digital
    instant gratification for me."

  2. #2
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Mid 1980s, if I recall correctly. Another one of EK's disasters--infringing on another company's patents.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #3
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    Kodak made and sold one instant film, PR-10, produced in the late 70s. It was heavier than the Polaroid instants and plastic in feel. It had a matte surface with rounded corners and a black back. It was discontinued by Kodak when Polaroid won the lawsuit contending that Kodak had infringed their patents. Kodak was ruled to have done so inadvertantly and to have worked diligently to avoid Polaroid patents and so the damages awarded were only about equivalent to royalties on the patents. Damages were not trebled for malicious intent.

    That ended Kodak's entire foray into instant.

    PE

  4. #4
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    I believe it was in the very late '80's or early '90's. I've still got one of the cameras. They ran into patent problems with Poloroid I think and had to discontinue production.
    WJS/wi/usa

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    Mid 1980s, if I recall correctly. Another one of EK's disasters--infringing on another company's patents.
    Before releasing the product, Kodak hired a group of prominent attorneys to evaluate this very thing. The consensus was that Kodak would not infringe any existing Polaroid patent. The judge ruled otherwise. But, because of this effort, he was unable to find Kodak guilty of any malicious intent to defraud Polaroid or any intent to harm Polaroid and so damages were quite minimal compared to what they would have been otherwise.

    PE

  6. #6
    marsbars's Avatar
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    It did have a very different feel from standard Polaroid's that I have handled.
    Thanks for the info. I can see the legal problems in that product. So now I have to wonder how fuji got around patent issues or if they paid through the nose to license it?
    "There is something about the mystery
    of what is on a roll of film that keeps
    me shooting, none of that digital
    instant gratification for me."

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by marsbars View Post
    It did have a very different feel from standard Polaroid's that I have handled.
    Thanks for the info. I can see the legal problems in that product. So now I have to wonder how fuji got around patent issues or if they paid through the nose to license it?
    Fuji licensed it. I don't know if they've divulged if it was "through the nose" or not, but many people seem to think Fuji's product (colour, at least) was more consistent, and many seem to prefer their colour palette to Polaroid's.
    i can't wait to take a picture of my thumb with this beautiful camera.

    - phirehouse, after buying a camera in the classifieds

  8. #8
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    Fuji has a product that is "identical" to Polaroid, but due to their technological superiority it is a far better product as they have better control over all aspects of manufacture and have some innovative technology. Kodak went a different route with direct reversal emulsions and a new kind of RDR chemistry that produced the image.

    In the offing was a 3000 speed film with superb dye stability. Patents on this can be found using the Kodak unique metallized dyes. If they had won the law suit, the instant photo field would have been a big winner for us all. Polaroid cut it off at the knees.

    PE

  9. #9

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    Fuji also has a product that is compatible with Kodak instant cameras, except for the speed. I forget what it is called, GT-800 or something like that.

  10. #10
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    I am not aware of that, but if they do, it would certainly infringe on both Kodak and Polaroid patents.

    PE

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