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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    ************
    Many thanks. ASTIA it shall be. We'll be visiting friends in the Vesteralen.
    Have a fantastic vacation and good luck to you and your bride.

    Don't think that Astia will disappoint you....obviously it would be worth running a couple of trial rolls before you go, just to check the best speed rating for your particular quipment and techniques. (I have no prob with the box speed generally, although just sometimes a tad less exposure will give a little extra depth to colors, just as it did with Kodachrome. Other than that, I find it really is super-accurate with soft colors, fabrics, and skin textures but still very accptable for landscape work if you don't want the saturation of Velvia.)

  2. #12

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    Apr 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by alan doyle View Post
    the kodachrome king is dead long live the new astia king.
    The new monach is not the same as the old, but IMHO I think he'll prove the right choice when we've finished mourning the old King's passing.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Monterey Co, CA
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    4x5 Format
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    303
    To my tastes, Astia is the best all-around transparency film by far, but I do also find that Velvia is sometimes the better choice. Both are essentially grain-free, though they are rather different emulsions.

    If you happen to have a lens or scene that is especially contrasty, Astia may be required. As already mentioned Astia also has a more accurate response with reds and skin tones. It also pushes to ISO 200 with almost no penalty.

    In lower contrast situations (say three stops of dynamic range) Velvia adds snap and saturation. It also gives the appearance of greater sharpness due to an enhanced local contrast/ adjacency effect-- much like Kodachrome.

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