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  1. #11
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Thanks, that is what I was thinking.

    Steve
    Sure thing.

    If you want to use filters over the camera lens to handle this, a color meter will tell you the ambient color temperature for the particular overcast day in question. Otherwise, just make a guess in the neighborhood of one of the aforementioned color temps, I suppose. 81A, 81B, or 81C are good guesses.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 07-20-2009 at 01:10 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #12
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    Using filters to correct for cool light on an overcast day will cause the same colour cast in the sky as it does when you correct on the enlarger. If you are shooting transparencies then finding a good middle ground may be a good idea, but it is not like correcting for an interior shot with mixed lighting. Or it is just like it if the interior has unfiltered light seen through a window. The window light will look nice and pink or cyan/blue depending on what you are correcting for. The big difference is that the temp change on an overcast day is far less (I'd be surprised if it were as much as 2k) and the sky isn't actually white but has a light tone and can/will pick up the filtration just like the window.

    If it is a print do a colour dodge or burn on the bit that is not what you like. For a trany maybe an nd Gr on the sky.

    Meanwhile, I don't think, other than reds that Kodachrome was all that saturated at least nothing like what is being made today (maybe like EPP). I've found it to have great tonal range and local contrast throughout especially in reds where other films seem to fall down.
    Last edited by jd callow; 07-20-2009 at 03:18 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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  3. #13
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Yes, I developed the habit from shooting 4x5 transparencies. I generally do it on neg film too, if I am using a tripod and such. I figure I may as well, since I have the proper filters in my case anyhow. I want to apply the CC to the sky and everything else in the picture equally. The same CC that will make the ground look pretty much how it looks will also make the sky look pretty much like it looks. The problem is thinking that a sky will turn out neutral, when you can look right at it in person and see that it is not really neutral at all.

    +2,000 K over clear noon light is indeed a large jump for mid day...but time of day does matter as well, as does the vastly variable definition of "overcast". I view it as everything from thin clouds, to fog, to storms-a-comin'...anything in which the light is coming entirely through the clouds instead of directly from the sun.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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