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  1. #11
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Personally, I avoid all the velvias for shots in which people and their skin tones are important- the colour palette just isn't nuanced enough for skin tones. I much prefer Astia 100F for that. Astia may now be the only slide film on the market today that can deliver realistic skin tones.

    Velvia 100F is the least 'velviesque' of the velvias and would have the best chance at decent skin tones, but nevertheless it'd not deliver what astia can. Velvia 50 for skin tones, oh hell no!

    Now for landscape, velvia 100 is my poison.

    Anyway I agree that you should try all of the above and arrive at your own conclusions. I predict that you when you have people in the scene, you will like Astia for slides and pro s (160s) or the similar Kodak product for negs.
    Last edited by keithwms; 07-22-2009 at 11:32 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  2. #12

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    As a long time Velvia user, i gave 100F a good try when it was introduced as their first attempt at a Velvia 50 replacement a few years back. Since they subsequently launched Velvia 100 and relaunched 50 I haven't had need to use it again. Indeed IMO it is by far the worst film in the Velvia "family" and had Fuji persevered with this version alone I have little doubt that I'd have been a committed Kodak slide film user by now.

    Velvia 50 I rate at box speed, though before its discontinuation I tended to set it at ISO 40. Velvia 100F I rated also at box speed ( for info the 100 -non F - I rate at 125). I particularly disliked the way in which by comparison with RVP50 the 100F seems to make skies look too magenta, and less strong foliage greens and yellow /oranges are pushed towards olive and brownish respectively. V100F is to me a strange mix of bright and gungy. By comparison RVP 50 could and still can hold a strong cyan and bright yellows and oranges very well.

    Both films share the Velvia characteristic of exaggerating slight nuances of colour in the light when lighting isn't strong, in particular at around dawn and dusk.

    The portrait issue? well I think the vast majority of photographers , insofar as they would choose a slide film at all for that application, would say that they avoid Velvias because they exaggerate the warm side of the spectrum (not identically as it happens but all noticably) and produce a result that many consider unflattering and unrealistic.

  3. #13
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Henderson View Post
    The portrait issue? well I think the vast majority of photographers , insofar as they would choose a slide film at all for that application, would say that they avoid Velvias because they exaggerate the warm side of the spectrum (not identically as it happens but all noticably) and produce a result that many consider unflattering and unrealistic.
    Was that well-stated paragraph really so hard?
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  4. #14
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    Using Velvia for portraits is like using Kodak UC 400 for a wedding. Yes you can do it and get do results many times, but some of the times the saturated colors will not be pleasing and then you will not be able to use the photograph. It is a risk.

    Steve
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  5. #15
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    If you want a Fuji slide film to shoot portraits, I recommend Astia 100 F It's made for it.
    Ben

  6. #16

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    I'd avoid Velvia for portraits, unless you're doing avant-garde fashion work that you want really saturated colors. I have used Velvia 50 to great enjoyment to do macro shots of tropical flowers. The colors are so bright they jump off the screen. Many people might not care for this more-vibrant-than-life approach, but I like it. I almost always use a Nikon A2 warming filter with it to keep my greens from having a blue cast, and I always use a Polarizer, too. I spot meter off a 18% grey card, and bracket by 2/3 of a stop. With a Nikon F100 and 200mm Micro, I usually get 2 out of 3 useable exposures. I know this is a little off topic, but it may help some others : )

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by jd callow View Post
    Not to sound flipant, but what is a pleasing portrait result to you?
    To me, based on my experience: One with a more neutral color palette than Velvia... one shot with Portra NC, for example. I don't even like portraiture with Portra VC.

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