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  1. #21

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    I like Kodak's 100 and 200 speed consumer neg films, and Fuji's 400 and 800. For an all-around film, but little indoor flash, I would use Gold 200. It gives you an extra stop of speed without that much extra grain. If you are using electronic flash most of the time, I would recommend Superia 400.

  2. #22
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Kodak Gold 100 will go far. I'll also say that I just enlarged some kodak 400 and it went nicely to 11x14. The grain was noticeable if you filled the entire area shortwise but not at all offensive. I would say that by picking any given film you're much more likely to go right than wrong. Films these days are very, very good. I'd overexpose a third stop or two or just run tests to see what works with whatever lab you choose.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Exactly, that is my heartburn.

    Steve
    What I think someone should do, maybe Kodak or Fuji, is make up 1/2L and 1L kits, the kit consists of enough chemicals to make 1/2L or 1L of usable solutions, which is enough to fill most home processing tanks. As labs get more and more scarce, this could become a big seller. I know Kodak has an E6 kit, but it's 5 gallons, or a little over 19L of solutions, a little large for home use, at nearly $90 in Canada it's a little expensive to. A kit that was 1/2L for $10 would probably be a huge seller, especially if it could do say 4 rolls of film.

    Speaking of film, I have a roll of B&W to process, maybe tonight, maybe tomorrow,
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  4. #24
    mts
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    I long ago moved to scratch-mix chemistry for both C41 and E6, because I need only 1-liter quantity for occasional use. You will have to learn a little about the chemistry of processing and invest in a decent chemical stock, but the expense and time spent is worth the trouble in my opinion. APUG contributors have been a great help in getting consistently good results from fresh chemistry at low cost from alternative C41 and E6 formulae.

    In Canada and also the US, JD Photochem has been a good supplier. You can purchase kits in 1-liter size at reasonable cost. www.jdphotochem.com
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mts View Post
    I long ago moved to scratch-mix chemistry for both C41 and E6, because I need only 1-liter quantity for occasional use. You will have to learn a little about the chemistry of processing and invest in a decent chemical stock, but the expense and time spent is worth the trouble in my opinion. APUG contributors have been a great help in getting consistently good results from fresh chemistry at low cost from alternative C41 and E6 formulae.

    In Canada and also the US, JD Photochem has been a good supplier. You can purchase kits in 1-liter size at reasonable cost. www.jdphotochem.com
    The last pricelist I got from Claire didn't have the kits on it,it has the individual chemicals, but not the kits.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  6. #26

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    cheap color negative film

    When it's on sale the 4-oacks of CVS 200 speed film is a good buy. I have a lot of it which I got for $4.99 a 4-pack of 24 exp. rolls. It's some kind of Fuji film. The Superia Xtra 400 is also reasonably priced at Unique Photo and B&H and scans very well. It may not have grain quite as fine as the Portra 400 films but it' still very good. I sometimes see the Kodacolor 200 in large packs at the warehouse stores.

  7. #27
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    We went to Sam's club yesterday to buy a couple bulk items and figuring on buying some Superia. Even though Sam's has a really big minilab setup, they don't sell any film at all. It's strange to me considering that walmart sells film, and I mean, people bring film in there to have it processed. They have to buy it somewhere; it stands to no reason that they process film but don't sell it.
    f/22 and be there.

  8. #28

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    Superia is super and Gold is golden.

    C-41 chems are toxic - use care!!
    I brake for fixer!

  9. #29

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    I really like the color of Fuji Reala, but the grain looks weird and I haven't gotten as much detail with it as other films I use. But its the only C-41 film I've used that gives a real pure blue sky that looks like slide films. I like the palette of Fuji's Pro160S/NPS pretty well too, but Portra scans a bit better for me.

    In the 800 speed films, Portra 800 and Kodak's Ultramax 800 have the same print grain index rating, but the 400 speed films are noticeably better. If I just needed ISO 800, I would typically choose to shoot ISO 400 at -1EC versus ISO 800 at box speed even though the colors are a bit muted.

    My favorite all around film is Kodak's HD400. It has finer grain than the current Portra 400NC, great detail and nice colors. It can still be found at B&H for about $3.50/roll. I talked my local shop into carrying it.

    I have mixed feelings towards Ektar. The grain is indeed very fine and it captures detail quite well, but there are some things about the palette and contrast that I'm not fond of. I think after I've shot a dozen rolls of it, I prefer the old UC100 or the Portra 160 films.

  10. #30
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    You may also want to try some Kodak HD400 which is pretty much one of the Kodak Gold films. It's pretty good.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

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