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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Keith;

    HQMS-K salt is a very slow acting mild version of HQ itself. It is also very very stable. In this case, where you want all of the color layers to start to develop at about the same time and continue to do so, HQMS is virtually ideal when compared to HQ itself. This discovery led to a change in the E6 process very early on, to prevent overdevelopment of the yellow layer and/or underdevelopment of the cyan layer. In current products, balanced for HQMS the top and bottom layers of all E6 products from Kodak and Fuji expect this balancing act to be present in the first developer.

    I might add that HQMS, to achieve this balancing act, is present in very high concentration. I think it is between 25 and 50 g/l.

    ChloroHQ is very active and not in general use anywhere due to the extreme expense. I would have to look it up in my notes to be sure.

    PE

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post
    Is he? I was not aware of that. Perhaps you could send him a PM.
    I have send him a email - that there is interesting conversation and that he maybe can say thing or two

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    I have send him a email - that there is interesting conversation and that he maybe can say thing or two
    Thanks, if he decides to participate in this thread, then his comments should be interesting to read.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Keith;

    HQMS-K salt is a very slow acting mild version of HQ itself. It is also very very stable. In this case, where you want all of the color layers to start to develop at about the same time and continue to do so, HQMS is virtually ideal when compared to HQ itself. This discovery led to a change in the E6 process very early on, to prevent overdevelopment of the yellow layer and/or underdevelopment of the cyan layer. In current products, balanced for HQMS the top and bottom layers of all E6 products from Kodak and Fuji expect this balancing act to be present in the first developer.

    I might add that HQMS, to achieve this balancing act, is present in very high concentration. I think it is between 25 and 50 g/l.

    ChloroHQ is very active and not in general use anywhere due to the extreme expense. I would have to look it up in my notes to be sure.

    PE
    Sounds interesting, particularly the stability you mentioned. Is it more expensive to manufacture HQMS compared to HQ? If it requires much higher quantities in developers compared to HQ, then may be it is prohibitively expensive if used for B&W processes rather than just for colour processes.
    I believe that chloroHQ was used in Paterson Acuprint developer, which might explain why it was discontinued.
    Sorry to be off topic concerning colour developers, but I didn`t realise there were so many different HQ derivatives around.

  5. #15
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    Keith;

    There is a rather longish thread on HQMS, and someone has posted the formula for making HQMS there. It is expensive as a solid, and the sythetic route gives very dilute HQMS so it is not a very viable procedure. If you can get and handle 30% peroxide, this might help. The synthesis posted uses 3% IIRC.

    The 30% variety can be very dangerous to work with.

    PE

  6. #16

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    Ascorbate ion is probably smaller than hydroquinone,might diffuse more rapidly,would that be worth an experiment with ascorbate instead of HQMS?

  7. #17
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    Alan;

    AFAIK, ascorbate did not work with E-6, but then I may have missed the report if it was tried and reported on. It might be that a stable liquid kit could not be made. IDK. I would be interested in the result if you try it.

    PE

  8. #18

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    PE,
    You mention also that the color developer may contain ethylene diamine.Is it known how much?Is it essential,the Fuji Formula does not have any?
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum40/4...i-recipes.html

  9. #19
    mts
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    E6 color developer requires ethylene diamine, at 4 ml/liter for the free-base. You can also use ED sulfate with adjustment for molecular weight, but it is needed for proper penetration of the lowest emullsion layers.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  10. #20
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    Ethylene Diamine is a mild silver halide solvent that helps attain good dmax with good dmin at the same time.

    I missed what MTS said. He is correct as well. There is a mild penetrating effect related to ED.

    PE
    Last edited by Photo Engineer; 07-27-2009 at 01:55 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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