Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,960   Posts: 1,523,092   Online: 978
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 30

Thread: Astia vs E100g

  1. #1
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,954
    Images
    1

    Astia vs E100g

    hey all,

    another brief question:

    Astia or E100G? I've come to like them both, and with the Samy's e-6 mail order processing, I've got a reason to shoot 4x5 and 120 chromes again , thank God!

    I've been shooting mostly color neg(160nc, I adore the color palette from this film!) up until now, just because I can print it at school in the color lab (PCC in Pasadena). I have the itch to shoot transparencies .

    Now I've come to a dilemna: I like both, and I don't like either for one reason or another for each.

    The ektachrome doesn't have very good reciprocity times from what I've read( especially for longer shots, ex: architectural at night), and is a little cooler at times when I'd like a warmer transparency.

    The astia is nice as a regular slide film, and is a bit cheaper. Sometimes its too warm, and most of the time its fine.

    Since I'll be starting school (if they'll take me that is ) at Art Center hopefully within a year if I can get this gen. ed out of the way, here in Pasadena. I'm a photo major btw.

    So, basically, my questions are this:

    1. Grain, which is the finer, best for scanning(I know, hybridphoto.com)
    2. Best for all-around. I really like EPN, and have a box left, but I'm using that for special projects, hence, it lives in the freezer.
    3. Longevity of availability: will Kodak or Fuji pull the plug on either of these within the next 5 years? What do you think?
    4. I shoot a mixture of people shots (mostly close-up portraits, similar to the ones by Marting Schoeller, google him, he has really cool work). I also really enjoy architectural photography when I can get access to cool places. Since so many places are closed to tripod use these days, it makes it hard.
    5. Do you have anything to add that you think I might have missed?


    opinions would be appreciated. I'm sick of shooting the same scene on both films at the same time in different backs, and I want some real world tests .

    thanks

    -dan


  2. #2
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,695
    Images
    23
    I am quite parial to the looks that I get from the Ektachrome films.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Klosterneuburg, Austria
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    97
    Astia 100F would not tolerate exhausted processing solutions as well as Kodak Elite Chrome 100/E100G(X), where Astia and Sensia 100 turn greenish. Grain - under the microscope or in a high-resolution scan - is virtually the same; but I would consider Provia 100F instead of Astia 100F, as the "older" film has the higher contrast at low spatial frequencies, apparently finer grain, and a really dense black. For medium- and large-format photography, this may be not as relevant as with 35 mm film.

  4. #4
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,946
    Astia or E100g ????

    That would be a very, very easy decision for me..... E100G!

    Hands down, no further discussion. Astia always looks like mud to me. Ektachrome E100G on the other hand is the best slide film I've ever encountered. If they quit making it, I'll stop shooting chromes.




    (psst...According to Kodak literature, E100G was designed for that hybrid photo thingy in mind too so, it doesn't get much better than this).

  5. #5
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,954
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    Astia or E100g ????
    (psst...According to Kodak literature, E100G was designed for that hybrid photo thingy in mind too so, it doesn't get much better than this).

    i never knew that! i've enjoyed the hybrid process so far(scanning wet mount on a friends Epson V750), and I've been getting 8x10 and 11x14 prints(glossy CA) done at Costco. So far, so good! I had a lab tech at Costco ask me if I was a pro, I said "not yet" . he had seen Martin Schoeller's work, as his g/f is really into photography, and he saw his portraits at a gallery in Santa Monica.

    I've got almost all my friends from high school shot, along with a few teachers I've tracked down. I just need access to a studio again, and get everyone left on the list available for the same day, etc.

    photography is more like herding cats . I've found that even though someone promises you that they'll be there, sleeping in can sometimes undo one's plans quite quickly .



    thanks everyone for the tips, if anyone else has something to add, please do!



    blessings,

    Dan


  6. #6
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,954
    Images
    1
    One more question: With these two films, how do they look when used in conjunction with a 80A filter? Normally I use EPY 64T, but I'm feeling that Kodak might discontinue that one soon . You never know though.

    so, filtration issues with either?

    thanks

    Dan


  7. #7
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,946
    you...we...really, really mustn't let fear of what Kodak might or might not do rule over us. Use what you like and use lots of it while you can!

    Life is short. Much to short to worry about such things. Get on with it.

    Seize the day Man!

  8. #8
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    IMO, get to know them both, and use them both. They are very different films. Fuji's strongest points are in doing long exposures, IMO. I have shot a ton of Provia 100, but generally prefer the character of Kodak transparency films for what I do.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #9
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,954
    Images
    1
    thanks all!

    E100g it will be then. Now to add to the 160/400nc and portra 800


    thanks

    -dan


    p.s. if anyone still has anything to add, please do!


  10. #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,531
    I'm using a lot of K64 at the moment (while I still can ), but when that's exhausted, I shall certainly switch to one of your own two choices, Astia or E100G. Much as I love K64 and regret losing that choice, I have to admit that these newer films have a lot going for them.

    With my equipment and lenses, I find Astia is very accurate in reproducing delicate artificial colors, fabrics, paints, etc., in good light, but can sometimes make greens in nature appear a little grey (the Fuji data sheet suggests the film for fashion work, but doesn't say anything about landscapes). E100G is also accurate, and maybe a little more natural in poor light...that's "natural" as one remembers or expects to see the scene, rather than perhaps 100% accurate. (Remembering, of course, that "Test Chart" accuracy does not necessarily produce the most pleasing result with real subjects and lighting.).

    Just my thoughts....they're both great films.

    As to how long each will be manufactured...who knows. To me, digital seems to have taken over much more quickly that I would have envisaged earlier this decade, but there does seem to be a certain plateau now in the use of analogue and I think (and certainly hope!) that there will be an ongoing and perhaps new interest in it, perhaps as an art form. IMHO, the present big manufacturers (Kodak, Fuji), may continue to "rationalise" their ranges of products on commercial grounds, but will hopefully be very reluctant to abandon analogue altogether.
    Last edited by railwayman3; 08-11-2009 at 04:24 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added a bit.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin