Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,058   Posts: 1,561,544   Online: 801
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    65

    Old Time Color Film

    So I'm looking to try some film that has the more muted colors and tones of an older style image and I was wondering if anyone here could provide a recommendation of where to start with this or perhaps more clarification is needed.

    I'm thinking 70s style film coloration with that warm fuzziness associated with it. I've linked a picture of exactly what I'm looking for. Let me know if you have any ideas!


  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,351
    Images
    148
    Kodacolor was like that, the C22 stuff, truly awful. Prior to C41 Agfacolor was vastly superior IMHO based on using both. And the Agfa hasn't faded either.

    Ian

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New York, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    142
    This looks like a fading print to me, not a particular look from an earlier film stock.

    Tim

  4. #4
    Mark Antony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Anglia,UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    772
    Images
    38
    Well obviously that print has aged, gone magenta/red the whites are creamy. IMHO nothing will give colours like that out of the box. What you can do is pick a low contrast emulsion like Portra NC 400 which will give a softer image with a little grain, over-expose it by 3 or stops to clog the highlights.
    I have done it successfully to give a retro look I feel here:


    Although without the aged 30 years look....

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    65
    Mark,
    That looks pretty good! Pretty much what I'd like to accomplish. Sorry about my included photo, didn't really know how to describe it well, but it seems you've captured it quite well.

  6. #6
    Mark Antony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Anglia,UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    772
    Images
    38
    this is a try to match your original:

    Same treatment as above but lightened and magenta/yellow. The film Fuji 160S overexposed.
    Oh the 1970's I remember them so well...
    Mark

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,504
    You'll have to do post-production in Photoshop to get the look and feel of a faded, color shifted print.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1970s-784069.jpg 
Views:	63 
Size:	183.8 KB 
ID:	15008
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    123
    Wild guess: Portra NC pulled 1-2 stops and overexposed another 1-2, plus a reddish brown stocking on the lens?

  9. #9
    tim_walls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Croydon & Leeds
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,037
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinholemaster View Post
    You'll have to do post-production in Photoshop to get the look and feel of a faded, color shifted print.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1970s-784069.jpg 
Views:	63 
Size:	183.8 KB 
ID:	15008
    Is this an announcement that they don't manufacture filters any more? Shouldn't this be in the product availability forum?
    Another day goes under; a little bourbon will take the strain...

  10. #10
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,981
    Images
    1
    Same recommendation as some above. Try the Portra NC line of films, overexpose by about 2 stops or so, and pull by the same(2 stops). You will block up the highlights, and have a low contrast negative to work with.

    In addition, throw a slight net filter over the lens to break things up a bit, or a piece of plastic food wrap, and in addition, a 10 points of red, and 5 points of yellow.

    try it out in various ways to experiment and see what YOU like.

    I've used the combo above, metering through the filters ( I was shooting transparencies at the time, so I had to have good accurate exposure).

    shooting with negatives will allow much more combinations than shooting with chromes, and when you pull the film in development, you can get less color cross-over than with slides.


    try out some different things, and see what you get! thats the fun of it!

    -Dan


Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin