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  1. #11
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    Richard;

    The males in my entire family on both sides were experienced welders and I began learning it when a teen. However, we referred to the welding gasses as those used to promote the welding. The inert gasses were named differently. Usually they were specified by name. My dad used to weld cracks in steel tanks in a chamber of inert Argon while wearing a flame retardant and heat resistant suit. The tanks were at red heat and were then annealed.

    They all welded Aluminum and other metals under inert gasses and had 3 tanks there for it. My dad also worked with Westinghouse at his plant near their Bettis Atomic works where he helped recover or weld rare metals such as Zirconium (which exploded when mistreated by a worker).

    I am using my uncle's Nitrogen tank and regulator for my darkroom as Nitrogen is a lot less expensive than Argon. His Acetylene tank is sitting next to it, empty. His second tank and his Oxygen tank along with a set of regulators and one torch went to an art student who wanted to do metal work. I have the rest of his box of welding and burning torches. Want to trade stories?

    So, bottom line is that nomenclature is vague on these gasses unless you use the name which is much more specific if you wish to try and prevent accidents. Fair enough? Sorry I was not clear enough for you.

    PE

  2. #12

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    PE,
    don't get touchy. You are obviously a great welder too. It is amazing how the engineers amongst us just gravitate to the same hobbys and interests. I have Acetylene, Oxygen, Argon and Argoshield 5%, all in commercial cylinders which cost a fortune to rent here in the UK. I had specified Argon earlier in the thread and my post was replying to the original posters reply to that first post when I had specified Argon. I still buy Argon for shielding my chemicals in hardware store sizes. I don't want to carry a 4ft cylinder in to my darkroom. Just as an aside; a, why do you keep empty welding gas bottles in your darkroom. b, Never never get rid of your gas welding gear. Every rust nut and bolt and every bit of broken tin work begs for the bottles.
    Richard.

  3. #13
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    Richard;

    I am not touchy. Sorry if I seemed that way. I am more upset that I am a terrible welder! I could never live up to the expectation of my dad in that regard. I do know the subject though and know that Argon is much too expensive for many people compared to Nitrogen.

    I keep the bottles in a spare area in the hallway behind my darkroom and pipe the N2 in through the ceiling. So, there is no space taken by the gas bottles. The N2 is the 4 ft size and the Acetylene is the 2 ft size. The two others are gone. The torches, tips, goggles, helmet, gloves and rods are in my shop. The hoses rotted out before my uncle gave the stuff to me when he retired. I never got any of their electric welding equipment.

    They had 6 core trucks and my dad had one. It was a fairly large enterprise in the 40s - 80s. They all did a lot of light steel construction in the area where I grew up.

    PE

  4. #14

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    PE,
    sorry for late reply. I am a builder by trade and we tend to do our own construction welding for which I still use a massive old Electric stick welder.
    The Mig machine is great and quick to use and will weld light tin work easily. But the Oxy/Acetylene gas welding gear is used for lead work. However, I would never be without oxy/acetylene; it is the perfect Yard Mans companion. Buy yourself some new hoses and Oxygen. You may even fabricate something for the darkroom. And unlike photography welding is craft without much of the art. ie If a messy weld does the job nobody is going to worry to much if your not charging for the result; and you will get better.
    Regards etc

    As an aside, can you buy these little gas cylinders in the states. They are about 1ltr/Quart sized and are great in the darkroom but very expensive for welding. You can not buy commercial sized cylinders in the UK, you have to rent them. This costs a fortune over the years whether they are used or not so DIY welders have to buy these little fellas.

    Richard.

  5. #15
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    Richard;

    Tank rentals are possible here in the US as well and cost a fortune. I am lucky I own the tanks.

    I did check with my Uncle, who is now 88, and asked him what he though of first when I said "welding gas" to him and he said he thought acetylene first then oxygen. I asked about the blanket or inert gases and he said that there were so many, they used the individual names such as Argon, Nitrogen and etc. So we may use different words here in the US.

    The small cylinders of gasses were once $7.50 / tank and you could buy about any gas including Phosgene and Chlorine. Fischer Scientific sold them. IDK if you can get them anymore.

    PE

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