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  1. #1

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    tried to develop c-22 in b&w

    I got a roll of Kodacolor-X which is listed as C-22 process. I tried to develop in HC-110 Dilution B for 10 minutes. I fixed for 10 minutes. Upon removal I have an almost opaque red backing and a milky white emulsion side. No images visible. What did I screw up? Can I save it?
    Last edited by amuderick; 08-24-2009 at 02:07 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    anyone? I'm just looking for confirmation that this roll was hosed and I didn't do anything wrong.

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Milky white would suggest undeveloped and unfixed, so that sounds rather odd.

    People do process C22 films in B&W chemistry, try a search & see what they have to say. C22 films had a much stronger orage masking to them.

    Ian

  4. #4
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    The roll is just fine. It looks that way because it is supposed to due to the orange colored couplers and the yellow filter layer.

    The milkyness should vanish when dry, but if it does not, you did not fix long enough.

    The negatives are probably printable but will require long exposures due to the reddish color. They will scan just fine. Just remember that the images will be B&W.

    PE

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    It should have dried between his two posts Ron

    Ian

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    It should have dried between his two posts Ron

    Ian
    I'm not leaving anything to chance on the possibility that he never bothered to look at it again assuming it was "hosed". I've seen that before as well. Kodacolor film had a milky look to the emulsion side and was rather opaque even when well processed. I've run the process so many times, I remember the look.

    More modern films have a much less pronounced milky look and it is almost entirely gone in the new papers.

    PE

  7. #7

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    The milky color disappeared when it dried. Thank you. Left was the orangey back (mask) and the silver colloid layer on the emulsion side. Some mottling and...upon inspection directly on a 40W bulb, I can see faint images now. Very faint. A toddler being held by a woman in sitting room chair. A man with a cap. It looks like they may have been taken indoors and maybe, vastly underexposed. That, plus 40 years of base fog doesn't help ;-)

    The mask is much denser than C-41. Held up to the light at arms length, you can barely see through it. I guess the yellow colloidal silver layer doesn't help the transparency either.

    I tried to scan but the scanner can't peek into that opacity. It only sees black. I played with a variety of settings but I only get noise. Maybe I'll try to make a cyanotype with it? Given enough time, it should peek through and give me something.
    Last edited by amuderick; 08-25-2009 at 03:07 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
    AgX
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    What about a reflection copy? I assume the image silver will reflect differently than the Carey Lea Silver.

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    You can bleach out the colloidal siver with a method given on Kodak's web site. I don't have the reference, but it was discussed recently here on APUG. It is basically a bleach that can remove the image as well, so you have to be careful to just go after the colloidal silver barrier layer.

    PE

  10. #10
    AgX
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    You'll find that yellow silver filter bleach recipe here:
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consu...s/pdf/ae31.pdf

    under: "To remove the stain from KODACHROME and KODAK EKTACHROME Films"

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