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  1. #1
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Chromogenic BW film in E6?

    A thought just struck me (as thoughts often do), and I was wondering if anyone has ever tried this before. If you put a C-41 BW film through E6 chemistry, will you get a Sepia Slide with halfway decent quality?
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
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  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The pinkish tinge to the film base will look quite foul.

    You could process a conventional B&W film in E6 at a LOW temperature and add colour couplers to the secomd Developer.

    But there's easier ways to get sepia slides Either use dr5 who's is highly recommended, or do your own B&W reversal processing then tone the relevant frame afterwards, there's so many ways.

    Ian

  3. #3
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    Ilford XP2 has a transparent base, unlike Kodak BW400CN. Not that I'm suggesting it's a good thing to put in E6 chems, but anyway.

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    Hi, I did this many years ago with Ilford XP-1; it worked well but the greyish tinged base rather spoilt the effect. I also exposed the film at EI 50. I don't know whether you'd have to do that with XP-2 Super in E-6. You will get a monochrome transparency, but it may not be all you hoped for and i doubt you'd get a sepia result; that comes from the way XP-2 is printed in minilabs on colour paper, not from the film itself. You can't tone XP-2 because the image is dye, not silver. You could dye it though.
    Last edited by kevs; 08-29-2009 at 03:21 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: clarify
    testing...

  5. #5
    Domin's Avatar
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    XP-2 in E6 has neutral tone, pink only in overexposed areas. Low contrast high dmin, low dmax.

    IIRC it needs push processing and possibly exposure at 100 or 200. I'm pretty sure you can find that on the net.

  6. #6
    Terrence Brennan's Avatar
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    I used to do that to make B&W duplicate negatives from colour negatives in one step. The result was low in contrast, so I would push it two or three stops in the E-6 First Developer to get enough contrast. AFAIR, the resulting negative had a somewhat bluish tint to it.

    The reason for this was that we would receive a colour negative, and we would have to make a large production run of B&W prints in a day or two. There was usually no time to order rolls of Panalure paper (which was difficult to work with, as it required total darkness in the B&W processing area), and less trouble than making a dupe B&W negative in two steps (which was fraught with sharpness and dust issues).



 

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