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  1. #11
    hrst's Avatar
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    Well, there can be many definitions for "easy". I think that the full-manual way is easy in that meaning that you can do it without failing even without any special practice. Of course the first time is a bit scary, as always . But if you have done BW before with the same tanks, you will without a doubt succeed with E6, also. I interpreted that this is what hoffy wants.

    The Jobo MAY be the "next level", later.

    In fact, there are more chances to fail if using some new approach. For example, within our photography club, one guy tried C-41 by himself (normally my friend or I start by showing how it works) with Jobo Processor, and he used wrong spiral type and got only the very first frames. So I can easily make an argument that using the Jobo is much more difficult, in one sense. You have many new things to learn.

    But, if by "easy" we mean that you just hang around and get things done more automatically, then the fully-manual method is a no-no. As said before, it totally takes your full attention for an hour. That's why I'm using the Jobo. But I wouldn't have bought it. Our club just happens to own it .

    2F/2F: If we are seeking for an easy and cheap way to get "reasonably" good results, the 1/2F temperature window can easily be compromised. 1/2F window means 99.75...100.25F, that is, 37.638... 37.91C. That may be the official specification, though, but we are speaking about something like 1/8 stop push/pull, max. You can't even meter the light so accurately, usually... And if you are speaking about these tolerances, the first thing you should suggest is to buy a densitometer (and have it calibrated) and the control strips. This extreme accuracy is meaningless if you don't know if the temperature/time is absolutely correct at all with the agitation and other processing characteristics.

    So, hoffy, don't take too much stress about the temperatures. You will get good results with the standard time and temperature given, even if your temperature swings 1, even 2 F. Of course, if you seek for precision, you can carefully shoot the first roll with a familiar camera/meter and a familiar film for you, in familiar lighting conditions. Then you may see if your slides are too bright or dark and make a small adjustment in FD time or temperature. But I would guess that they are perfectly ok. You can't judge that precisely with your eyes without direct side-by-side comparison. I'll give you an example: Tetenal's instructions are very fuzzy and first I undestood that with Jobo the FD should be 7min at 39C instead of 6:15 at 38C. First I used that time and temp and THAT (45 sec over and 1.8F over) lead to results that were clearly too bright judged even by eye, but still completely usable; it is about half stop push.

    Kodak 7-bath 5L kit seems to be quite cheap. Tetenal's 3-bath (it's really 4-bath) seems to be more expensive. 3-bath is a little "easier" and faster but the difference is not so big because there are LESS washes in 7-bath than in 3-bath kit. The difference in total time is only a few minutes.
    Last edited by hrst; 09-02-2009 at 10:01 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12

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    11x14 tray with 6 two reel developing tanks. Use a lift rod with one film on the bottom, one empty on top. Bring the reel and film to 100 so as not to cool down the developer. Use one shot and throw away.

    An aquarium bubbler to airate the bleach

    Buy extra first developer as that is what goes bad first and it is cheap.

    Use a 6 component kit as the color is way better. Mixed bleach and fix dies not clear film as well. I tried them all and aways go back to Kodak 1 gallon kit. Just the way it is. Sorry

  3. #13
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Temperature control is not completely critical for most applications. I maintain a water bath at 102 and heat chemistry to 102 before pouring in using my gas stove and a double boiling setup. Simply keeping the tank submerged is good enough to ensure moderate heat transfer.

    The Kodak E6 is cheap and it works. Lots of steps though so try to do 4 rolls at a time.

  4. #14

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    Isnt the FD the most critical part in terms of temperature? And for that too, I guess the average temperature is enough, if the changes are not too great during the development. The rest are really not that critical AFAIK. E-6 with 3-bath is fairly easy but might feel a bit long as a process, compared to negative processes. Still if you like to shoot slides, I'd go for it. Also I've read that the 7-bath solution would be better for longevity of the images, so I'd consider it seriously instead of easy 3-baths (even though those are what I've used so far and they have worked ok judging by the image quality, cant say much about longevity yet..)
    Last edited by Svitantti; 09-05-2009 at 07:20 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
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    THanks for the suggestions. I have tried in the past keeping water temps as close as possible to the right temp, but with little success. I have noticed that the local pet store has small acrylic fish tanks with heaters for not too much. I am not sure what the heater temp goes to, but I would possibly give that a first up try. Cheers

  6. #16

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    To be honest, I havent always been very careful about the temperatures - as long as they are about where they should be. I have gotten good results with Tetenal 3-bath this way so I am guessing it is really not about third of a degree (celsius), maybe not even half. But also, I dont shoot stuff that is planned and lit in a studio or so... more like street photography where you cant easily notice very slight changes like color shifts. If you shoot that kind of stuff, I wouldn't stress too much about the temperatures, but if you shoot stuff that is really color critical, maybe someone else can tell more

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    THanks for the suggestions. I have tried in the past keeping water temps as close as possible to the right temp, but with little success. I have noticed that the local pet store has small acrylic fish tanks with heaters for not too much. I am not sure what the heater temp goes to, but I would possibly give that a first up try. Cheers
    Aquarium heaters usually only go up to about 32C, but with the simple ones you can pull the thermostat knob off and put it back on in a different position to make it go the extra distance.

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