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  1. #21
    dwdmguy's Avatar
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    This weekend I'll pick up the Kodak Reversal TMax kit and give her a try.

    As I've mentioned prior there will be a cali lab doing this, NOT a .dr5 as that is indeed a priop. process, but a B/W reversal process. The TMax kit seems to be a bit expensive at $42 per Qt. but it if gives me the results I'm looking for it may be worth it.
    Thx

  2. #22

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  3. #23

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    I 've done it some 8 times using the Foma Pan R kit. The films were both Foma pan 100R and Agfa Scala 200x. The results were excellent. The process is quite time consuming and a bit complicated but nothing that the average photographer can't do. The Ilford proposed process is quite similar. http://www.flickr.com/photos/charalampidis/3920689821/
    Last edited by alxsav; 11-25-2009 at 04:43 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #24
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    ..the kodak kit is discontinued.



    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    Kodak still offers a T-Max reversal kit.

  5. #25

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    my two cents

    Hi, ive used a few of the kits and was happy with the results but some of them are a bit complicated and i find the cost of a kit a little silly considering the small yeild.

    Ive dabbled and come up with my own method which is cheap and seems to give good and consistant results.

    I use fairly cheap ingredients as follows -

    Developer - Fotospeed PD5 "print" developer (mixed 1-9 parts)
    bleach - 20% sulphuric acid solution with 2.5 grams potassium permanganate added for each litre
    clearing bath - Potassium Metabisulphite (30 grams in a litre of water)
    fixer - Fotospeed FX20 (mixed 1-9 parts)


    No doubt somebody will criticise the harsh nature of a paper developer but ive had my most accurate results using paper developers and decided to stick to it long ago. For those of you in other parts of the world the developer and fixer I buy is very similar to the run of the mill, budget chemicals that Ilford sell. <only much cheaper >

    All very bog standard ingredients and very cheap to buy seperately. it really gets the cost down in a big way buying ingredients seperately rather than using a kit. i find that the clearing agent is cheapest to buy from supermarkets sold as a sterilizing agent for home brew beer. but still really cheap from photo suppliers. it costs me well under £2 all up to mix enough ingredients for a large session.

    -I do a first develope for 8 minutes
    -Bleach for 10 minutes
    the rest is done in daylight
    -I then clear for 1 or 2 minutes
    -then I hold it up to a lightbulb for around a minute with the last rinse water still in the tank (turning slowly)
    -develope for another 2 minutes
    -and finaly fix for around a minute and a half but i tend to monitor the fixing by eye and dunk it in clean water at just the right moment. The fixer acts quite quickly and its easy to overcook it when youre not keeping an eye on the film.

    All with the obvious rinsing in between stages.

    Also everything you read about this sort of thing will say throw away your bleach after the session. I usualy put some scraps of film in it that still have emulsion on them (heads, tails, unwanted etc) to exhaust the permanganate and then leave it sit for a few days in the bottle. over a few days all the spent permanganate settles on the bottom and you can decant the good acid out into another bottle and re-use - ive been doing this for years and only have to top it up a tiny bit with acid, water and fresh permanganate before I go again.

  6. #26
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    cp, I've done a bit of this with many of the same chemicals and had decent results but haven't refined it yet. What I don't understand is after the bleach process you can work with the lights on, but then holding it up to a light bulb. What about all the exposure the film is getting when the regular lights are one? See what i'm getting at?
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  7. #27

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    I had the same thoughts once so tried cutting out that step, and what i finished up with was an uneven exposure. some parts were just too faint - im guesing that these areas were a little shaded by the spiral maby??

  8. #28

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    I should also add that the timings I use are tweaked for cine film so possibly a tiny bit higher contrast than some people might like - but hey, not everybody wants exactly what the manufacturers say... we all adjust a little.

  9. #29

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    I've had fairly easy success using the Speedibrews reversal kit.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
    cp, I've done a bit of this with many of the same chemicals and had decent results but haven't refined it yet. What I don't understand is after the bleach process you can work with the lights on, but then holding it up to a light bulb. What about all the exposure the film is getting when the regular lights are one? See what i'm getting at?
    The important bit is getting the original negative developed. That is the "Mask" for the subsequent reversal. Once that has been bleached out, the remaining emulsion is there to "fill in" the gaps. Its developed to completion. As its there to fill in the gaps left over, more exposure over and above whats required to get maximum density doesn't really matter, the image has already been set as blank bits.
    "Flatter Me, and I May Not Believe You. Criticize Me, and I May Not like You. Ignore Me, and I May Not Forgive You. Encourage Me, and I Will Not Forget You."

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