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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I use 100 and 320 respectively instead of 160 and 400, whenever possible.

    The films are not slow, I just prefer that extra assurance by overexposure a tad.

    PE

  2. #12
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    160nc:100, pull 1/3 stop (I like the lower contrast a tad)

    400nc:250, run normal

    there is no definitive answer to your questions unless you test. This obviously would involve the meter you intend to use, internal or handheld.

    Include a colorchecker chart or gray card(at least) in some of your shots.

    Are you wet printing, or doing the hybrid process? (I do both, and I've found the hybrid process allows for greater contrast control). My speeds work for both for me.

    Shoot one roll @ 160, one at 125, and one at 100, and 80(if you want to be very thorough) .

    Develop 1st(160) roll @ NORMAL(according to 3:15 or normal at the lab), scan or print. See results. See if you like what you see.

    Develop subsequent rolls(2-3 or 2-4) at normal,etc...

    You can see where I'm going. I have homework to do


    best of luck!

    Dan


  3. #13
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    Here is a series shot on 160 VC and processed with normal development times.

    They are scans of contact prints on Endura paper with constant exposure time (12") and only the f stop was varied.

    The exposures in order are leftmost normal ISO 160.

    Second column ISO 25, 50 (top, bottom)
    Third column ISO 100, 200 (top, bottom)
    Forth column ISO 400, 800 (top, bottom)

    You can see visually the huge latitude. I did the same test on Portra 400.

    Shot with an RZ67, prism meter on auto.

    PE
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails f56.jpg   f8.jpg   f11.jpg   f16.jpg   f22.jpg  

    Last edited by Photo Engineer; 09-22-2009 at 06:00 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: I labeled the exposures backwards.

  4. #14
    Thomas Böttcher's Avatar
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    Thank you very much guy´s.
    There are many different answers so I have to make my own experience. My last 160 NC I pulled to 100ASA and I got good results.

    Thanks, Thomas

  5. #15
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    Boxed speed with both 35mm and 120.
    Ben

  6. #16
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    Well, my point in the photos above was that there is a 1 stop latitude leeway in which you do not have to push or pull. Just normal processing with a 1/3 overexposure will probably give you the best of all possible worlds with any format of a given negative film.

    PE

  7. #17
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    PE,
    Could you please explain those examples a little better? ? ?
    What are the ISO ratings for the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, & 5th contact sheets?

  8. #18
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Bruce;

    This is 1 roll of 120 film exposed at (from L to R top to bottom):

    ISO 160 - reference, 25 - t, 50 - b, 100 - t, 200 - b, 400 - t, 800 b.

    These were then contact printed onto Endura paper at 12" with one stop increments from f5.6 to f22. The film and paper were processed normally. Due to the changes in f stop, the paper should show at least one image that is "correct" or nearly correct for the ISO rating. The result shows that usable or even quite good pictures can be obtained from about ISO 50 to about ISO 400. And, no push is needed.

    So, all of the sheets have the same ISO rating, just a different printing exposure to "highlight" the best frame with the "right" ISO for the amount of light given during printing. The bottom line is that negative films have a huge latitude without push or pull processing and usually look best about 1/3 stop overexposed.

    PE

  9. #19
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    PE,
    Ahh,
    thank you kindly.
    You varied the printing times as well as the exposure on the RZ.

    Thanks
    Bruce

  10. #20
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    The print time was constant, the f stop varied.

    PE

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