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  1. #1
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    CURRENT info C-41 chemicals Or C-41 for Dummies????

    I have read through countless threads about home C-41 process. I have read Kodak tech bulletins and then tried to find the chemicals as listed from the Kodak publication, only to find they are currently unavailable?

    Is it possible for some who is experienced to post a "C-41 for Dummies" thread????

    I process my own B&W and have been to Gary B's house and watched him process C-41. The process itself is not so much the question as is wading through the chemistry.
    I know there is a developer, bleach and fixer but Kodak has so many different versions of each.

    I know Tetnal has a "press kit" Developer, blix, stabilizer that looks more attractive all the time.

    I would prefer to separate the bleach and fix. From what I have read, you will get better results.

    So to summarize, to Process C-41 color negative film at home in a small hand held tank what chemicals do I need? Are they currently available in the US?

    If I can ask, please be specific about the chemicals needed.
    Developer???? developer/replenisher???? both????
    Which bleach?
    Which fixer?

    I am sorry for being such a "dummy"...
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  2. #2
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Go here: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/busin...85/12319/12549

    You will see that for our purposes we should use the KODAK FLEXICOLOR SM Tank Developer for our small sink line and rotary processes. Further information is here:

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/busin...?pq-path=12550

    with a full process manual.


    I do not suggest the powdered Tetenal "press kit" as they used (when I bought one) solid sodium thiosulfate and sodium ferric EDTA which are not strong enough to blix (or even bleach) modern day color films.

    You might consider calling Kodak's hot line and asking them for what product to order.

    They did make a product for small tanks that did not need a starter. It was sold in 1 and 5 gallon kits.

    PE

  3. #3
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Here is an added reference for the SM developer which does not use any starter.

    If you use a replenisher, you will need a starter for the developer-replenisher, but not for the other solutions.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...41SM_Tank.html

    PE

  4. #4
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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  5. #5

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    I was doing the same research myself last night. I found one place that looked promising, but I'll have to post them tonight. Most of the threads, as you say, are inconclusive on where to get the chems, but I was able to put together a fairly definitive list of WHAT is needed.

    @PE, as I'm sure you know, those chems can only be bought at the B&H store, no shipping, but thanks for identifying the part #.

  6. #6

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    I bought the press kit because I wanted small amounts to start with. Still haven't started, since I read here the chems don't last long I wanted to do all my test rolls at once. I suppose if the blix is not strong enough, these won't be rolls that matter greatly to me anyway.

    Can the liquid concentrates be diluted for each roll you develop rather than mixed all beforehand? Or does that not help extend the shelf life at all?

    Is there any reason photo-flo can't be used? I assume it should be fine but I don't know.

  7. #7
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Here is the Kodak chemical list I have assembled for someone here to tell me if these are correct.
    Flexicolor SM developer Kodak #1756337
    Flexicolor Bleach III kodak # 8940801
    Flexicolor Fixer/replenisher # 1983550
    Flexicolor Stablizer 8729956
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  8. #8
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jglass View Post
    @PE, as I'm sure you know, those chems can only be bought at the B&H store, no shipping, but thanks for identifying the part #.
    That site was the only one that I found the small kit mentioned. I am fully aware of their restrictions, but that part # can be ordered via local photo stores.

    I have posted a list of chemistry here before with Kodak ID #s but I saw that they were pretty much obsolete.

    The list in the post above appears current.

    PE

  9. #9
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    Fuji has a 5 liter kit that contains everything for small-tank processing: developer, bleach, fix and stabilizer. See: http://www.ag-photographic.co.uk/fuj...t-5l-680-p.asp .

    Tetenal's current liquid C-41 kits have worked for me, but they use a blix (instead of separate bleach and fix) and PE says it's a no-no, and I believe it, having seen other faulty products from Tetenal also. I made one side-to-side comparison with Portra 160VC (Tetenal blix worked 100% ok) but as a slower speed film it may be easier to blix, so the blix may not work so well with all films.

    Development is easy even for a newbie if you have done some BW before. Just use your usual tank but place it in a water bath of 100F/38C with the chemicals. If the water temperature drops, add some hot water. Wait until the chemicals are at correct temperature and then just process the films following the directions for the chemicals. Couldn't be much easier.
    Last edited by hrst; 09-28-2009 at 04:23 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The Tetenal liquid kit is probably better than the all powder Press Kit that they make. The all powder version uses sodium salts, as I said, in the blix and therfore would probably be marginal or poor. Since blixing or bleaching and fixing go to completion, you might eventually get it to "time out" by using long immersion times in these solutions.

    PE

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