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  1. #21
    JBoontje's Avatar
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    I knew that you could store film in a fridge/freezer.. but this question came to mind when I loaded a roll of film yesterday (my third, to be exact)

    Should I cool it down before I put it in the camera, or should I keep it at fridge/freezer temperature? Will I notice any difference at all?

  2. #22

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    Definitely. I usually ate the ice cream in the freezer before handling my films there.

    I am worrying my 46mm 400VC films now. This is the best film I ever used (except that there is Ektar 100 now). Does school photography still use this format of film? I got mine before they expired and has since been in the freezer. Now they are 4 or 5 years past expiration. Will more ice cream help?
    Last edited by mtjade2007; 10-15-2009 at 04:20 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #23
    alexmacphee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBoontje View Post
    Should I cool it down before I put it in the camera, or should I keep it at fridge/freezer temperature? Will I notice any difference at all?
    Let the film come up to ambient (room) temperature before putting it in the camera. You otherwise risk moisture condensation forming on the film.
    Alex

  4. #24

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    46mm? Is that a typo for 35, or the width of 127?

  5. #25

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    No, it's not a typo. It is a 46 mm roll film, 200 feet long. It is for a Camerz school photography camera. I got a camera too. Actually I have two Camerz cameras, one for 70 mm and the other for 46 mm films. Tried on the 70 mm one with a short strip of 70 mm VC400. The image quality came out stunningly beautiful. The final images are equivalent to 6x4.5 format. I shot the test strip under sunlight (not strobe light). It made me realize how good Camerz cameras are.
    Last edited by mtjade2007; 10-16-2009 at 12:00 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26

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    According to this thread older C-41 (pre 2003?) processes have to be stablized in a different manner, so if you have old rolls processed at commercial labs they are not being stabilized correctly. A good reason not to bother with really old color film unless you plan on scanning or copying them immediately.

  7. #27

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    Yes, thank you for reminding me. I can stabilize the film with an old stabilizer. It will do the job for both new and old films. I believe my 46 mm 400VC roll is post 2003 though.

  8. #28
    ericdan's Avatar
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    I am hording Provia 400X. Anybody know how long high speed slide film will last?
    I have it sealed in the freezer, but I assume it won't have the same shelf life as 100 speed film.

    I just shot a roll of Kodak slide film that's been expired for 5 years and sitting at room temperature.
    To my surprise it was absolutely fine.

  9. #29
    jnanian's Avatar
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    ericdan

    your experience matches mine both for color film and for black and white

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/1...ifference.html

    about halfway through the thread you will see information posted by a appugger named "mr bill"
    he worked for a major portrait company and he and his workmates did all sorts of "destructive testing"
    on color film ( "hot box" ). it was interesting to see that color films are quite robust and they did not degrade
    as one might imagine they would.

    me, personally i only shoot expired film these days, some old, some very old, and while i don't use a densitometer
    (and don't care to use one ) i haven't found much trouble in my expired emulsions. YMMV thought, because
    others in the thread posted their findings ( B/W ) from using a densitometer, and posted #'s but even after they were
    asked what the numbers meant their meanings were never revealed ... so my guess is that "there was a little fog" ...
    and too much for their taste?

    as for your provia ( i have about 300+ sheets at room temperature as well ) it might suffer a little contrast loss? maybe a little speed loss
    and maybe a little color shift ... i'm processing all mine in b/w so i rate it slow ( way less than half box speed )
    and processing it in dilute print developer first and then coffee developer.


    good luck

    john

  10. #30
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    A simple answer to the O.P's question is "not long enough".
    Ben

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