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  1. #21
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I don't use a bulk loader, even though I have several of them. I directly roll the film from the bulk spool onto the camera spool, tear it off and load it in the cassette. After I have all my cassettes loaded, I trim the leaders with scissors.

    One thing I do miss about bulk loaders is the frame counter. My rolls have a variable length of film on them now. I could measure the length, but that would require peeling the whole length off at one time, measuring it, and then rolling it on the camera spool. Seems inviting to dust.
    f/22 and be there.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by AndersPS View Post
    But if I do 10 exposure loads I sholu get more than 18? Now, I┤m not going to do 10 of all the bulk film, bur some test loads to learn to develop.

    ///Anders S
    Yes, you'll get more than 18, but the overhead of the leader and trailer is the same for a 10 exposure roll as it is for a 36 exposure roll. Bottom line is that the longer each roll, the more total frames you get from that 100 ft. The practical limit for each roll is 36 exposures due to the limitations of the cassette, the camera, and the processing equipment.
    Frank Schifano

  3. #23
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    Now I understand! It is less expensive to load 18 36exp., than it is to do 10exp. rolls? am I correct?

    ///Anders S

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndersPS View Post
    Now I understand! It is less expensive to load 18 36exp., than it is to do 10exp. rolls? am I correct?
    Yes: the thing is, you waste a fixed number of frames (film length) per roll (loaded film casette).
    Hypothetically, let's say that 5 frames (about 19 cm) are wasted* for each cassette (roll) you load. The more film you cut (the smaller the number of frames per roll), the more you waste. So, if you get 18 rolls of 36 exposures per one bulk film, you will NOT get 36 rolls of 18 exposures from the same bulk, because by halving the number of frames per roll, you are also DOUBLING the number of wasted frames

    * Actually, the number of wasted frames varies depending on the type of bulk loader. I find the Watson bulk loader to be particularly wasteful: it wastes several frames at the END of the spooled cassette, in addition to the 3-4 frames at the beginning.

  5. #25
    Denis R's Avatar
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    without loader

    measure bulk film same way as bulk chain
    nail at one end of work bench, cut mark at other spot
    hook film on nail and pull desired amount out of package
    cut and fasten to spool, starting end attached until all is wound on spool
    very little waste
    after practice, cut leader and load camera in dark
    64.5" for 36x

    http://web.archive.org/web/200408150...ilmlength.html
    Kodak Duaflex II with kodet lens
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    Only a photographer knows the true value of infinity

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denis P. View Post
    I find the Watson bulk loader to be particularly wasteful: it wastes several frames at the END of the spooled cassette, in addition to the 3-4 frames at the beginning.
    This can be annoying, and not just because of the wastage, but the risk of a valuable image being shot on the dud trailer. The way I got round this was to kick-start the cassette load inside the changing bag. Of course, you could argue that you might as well dispense with the loader in that case, but the loader is still convenient enough for counting frames.
    Alex

  7. #27
    fotch's Avatar
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    Maybe I am missing something but if you load 36x according to the loader, and snap 36x and then rewind, how do you lose a good shot?
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #28
    alexmacphee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    Maybe I am missing something but if you load 36x according to the loader, and snap 36x and then rewind, how do you lose a good shot?
    If you're thinking about the Watson/Computrol type loader, the film comes from the supply drum through a light tight gate and in to the cassette loading chamber. In daylight, you open open the door to the cassette chamber, and there will be an inch or two of film leader there. Open your cassette and tack the inch or two of film coming out, on to the cassette spindle, close the cassette, and put the cassette back in the cassette chamber so that the crank engages where it should. Then replace the light-tight door to the cassette chamber, and crank until you've turned in the number of frames you want, plus a few extra to allow for the leader you're going to trim in the usual way. Open the cassettre chamber, cut the film, remove the cassette, and trim the leader.

    There's an interlock with the cassette chamber door which means you can't open it until you've turned the cover on the supply drum in such a way that the gate inside becomes light-tight, then you can open the door to the cassette.

    Because there's always an inch or two of film poking out from the supply drum to the cassette chamber, that short length will be wasted, and will form the last couple of frames when the cassette is being used in the camera. Normally, you'd add an extra couple of frames to your count, say, 38 instead of 36 (plus film leader on top of that) to allow for it, and just make sure never to go past the '36' on your camera's film counter. In my early days, I made just that mistake. I got into the habit of putting the loader into a changing back whenever I had to open the cassette chamber door, to avoid having exposed film at the end of the strip. I got used to doing that, though I can understand some wouldn't want to be bothered with that inconvenience.
    Alex

  9. #29

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    Can't you do that in the dark, until the loader is shut light-tight?

  10. #30
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    Yes, if you've a darkroom. For various reasons, my darkroom is in storage and I need to make do for the time being with makeshift arrangements. For the time being, I'm processing film to scan to print until I can get the proper darkroom and wet bench re-established.
    Alex

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