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  1. #11

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    In addition to the hybrid-workflow processes mentioned by jslabovitz, I don't like the short lifetime of colour print film. I'm mainly a b&w shooter, and I've gotten used to the idea that both prints and negatives should be hanging around in good condition for a hundred years or so if properly cared for. I'm not sure what the realistic lifetime of E-6 materials is in practice, but it's got to be longer than C-41.

    Also, medium-format transparencies just look delicious.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  2. #12
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiron Kid View Post
    Does anyone still use slide projectors?
    My "slide projectors" are my Apple TV and Mac Mini connected to a 1080p projector.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiron Kid View Post
    Does anyone still use slide projectors?
    Absolutely. The impact of a well-exposed, projected slide cannot be overstated.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  4. #14
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    I have always enjoyed slide film, until i tried ektar 100, i really like the latitude of the negative film, really dont have to worry about blanked out shadows on sunny days, though i do like the colors better with the slide film, oh well you cant have it all i suppose
    "Why thats one of those old black and white cameras aint it?"

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by jslabovitz View Post
    I've been shooting B&W negatives for a long time, and recently decided to try to understand more about color.

    As an experiment, I ordered a few rolls of most of the color neg film out there (at least in 120, which is my primary format), both for landscapes and portraits. Ultimately I found two truths, for me: first, I just didn't like the colors of any of them. They were okay, but just didn't move me as much as a great B&W film. The "neutral" films (Kodak Portra NC, Fuji 160C/400H/Reala) were boring, and the saturated versions of those films were, well, too saturated. (Fuji 800Z was okay, but still not quite right.)

    Second, I had a bear of a time scanning! I know, neg film should be easier to scan, not harder, but every time I looked at the shadows, I just hated the grit in there. Not the same sort of thing as B&W grain, at all. Perhaps I need to expose color neg film more, but I used the same technique I've used for years with B&W, where my exposures tend to be just about right. (And I'm using an Imacon Photo, an excellent film scanner, so it's definitely not my gear.)

    I should also point out that my ability to color-correct, well, sucks. When I see the image the scanner's made for me of the color neg, I can see that it's wrong (and often is), but I have a really difficult time figuring out how to "fix" the colors. I can see they're not right, but something about the workflow just doesn't sit well with me & my brain.

    Recently I tried Fuji slide film, specifically Provia 400X. I totally love it! If I expose it correctly, the grain is aesthetically pleasing (or just not there at all), and the colors are just muted enough without being boring or bizarre. Scans were much easier and more right-on out of the scanner than the color negatives. (The Imacon has a great dynamic range, which probably makes it more suitable for transparencies than some lower-end scanners.)

    So, my reason for using slide film isn't about projection at all, but about the "feel" of the colors, ease of scanning, and the more accurate rendition.

    Granted, slide film isn't for everything. I still plan to shoot a lot of Neopan 400 in my rangefinder, and Acros and other slower-speed films on my Mamiya. I've got a Fuji S5 DSLR for low-light color and quick-turnaround jobs. But the Provia has a real place in my toolbox.
    Did you try RA-4 printing? It's a different experience.

  6. #16
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    So, my reason for using slide film isn't about projection at all, but about the "feel" of the colors, ease of scanning, and the more accurate rendition.
    This, but I like projecting too. I shoot slide film because I drop it off, and when it comes back I have slides. They don't need scanned, printed, or color corrected. I don't have to feel guilty about not scanning them or printing them. It's a black box-- exposure in, slides out. For me, color is about snapshots and vacation photos. Slide film does this perfectly for me.
    f/22 and be there.

  7. #17

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    I shoot a fair amount of color negative film, but I do some slides. I have two slide projectors.

    Jeff

  8. #18

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    I don't care much for post-processing, whether in a computer or a darkroom, so E-6 and in-camera adjustments have always been what gives me full control over my images. That plus the impact of a projected slide have kept me shooting it for my serious stuff, although I love the newer C-41s for family shots and messing around (it helps to have a local pro lab that makes great prints). I also sell some work and more publishers still prefer slides over color prints.

  9. #19
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    From my point of view, slides offer the greatest total number of output options. Yes, the range of the scene has to be just right and the exposure latitude is smaller, but notwithstanding those constraints, which are really minor if a person knows what he/she is doing with a meter, slides can be used to...

    1) ... generate enlarged b&w negs in one easy step
    2) ... make polaroid/fuji image and/or emulsion transfers (which is much more controllable and reproducible than shooting straight to the instant film)
    3) ... make ilfochromes
    4) ... scan and get very, very smooth and high resolution results for hybrid techniques
    5) ... relish the slides on a light table
    6) ... last but not least, impress the living daylights out of the audience of a slideshow, most members of which will have never seen anything better than 800 pixel output from powerpoint run through a low-end projector
    Last edited by keithwms; 10-19-2009 at 01:51 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling....
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Schoof View Post
    I don't care much for post-processing, whether in a computer or a darkroom, so E-6 and in-camera adjustments have always been what gives me full control over my images. That plus the impact of a projected slide have kept me shooting it for my serious stuff, although I love the newer C-41s for family shots and messing around (it helps to have a local pro lab that makes great prints). I also sell some work and more publishers still prefer slides over color prints.
    Are publishers still preferring slides? The last few shots that I've sold to publications, wanted a high res scan. Not a slide or print. I suppose if I had a high quality dedicated film scanner, I'd burn more slide film. They really do look great on the light table or projected.

    Kiron Kid

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