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  1. #21

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    From Photo-Lab-Index, page 16-04:

    "Prints are also suplied by Eastman Kodak Company. Three sizes are made from 35mm and Bantam transparencies under the name of Minicolor prints, and a large number of sizes are made from Kodachrome Professional films under the name of Kotavachrome.
    Kodak Minicolor prints are enlarged from either 35mm or Bantam sized Kodachrome transparencies by a standardized process in the Kodak Labratories in Rochester. They are made only from Kodachromes in 2 x 2 mounts with the standard central openings. Enlargements are avaiable in three sizes. The '2X' is about 2 1/4 x 3 1/4. On these the corners are rounded and there are no margins. The larger size '5X' affords a print 5 3/8 x 7 4/5 and prints are returned in mounts--for horizontals, 8 3/8 x 10 1/4 and for verticals, 8 3/8 x 11 9/16, the picture opening, or area measuring 5 x 7 1/2. The largest size, '8X', is approximately 8 x 11, and is returned mounted in a folder.
    The quality of a Minicolor Print naturally depends on the quality of the Kodachrome transparency from which it is made. A good properly exposed transparency whic will project well should yield a good color print.
    The 'feel' of a Kodak Minicolor Print, particularly in the smaller size, is that of a playing card, strong, attractive, and resilient. The print support, or base, however, is not paper or card, but white pigmented cellulose acetate.
    Kotavachrome Professional Prints are reproduced from Kodachrome Professional Film Transparencies and must be made by Kodak Laboratories by the Kodachrome process in the following sizes: 8 x 10, 11 x 14, 14 x 17, 16 x 20, 20 x 24, 24 x 30, 30 x 40. They will be made from all sizes of Kodachrome Film Transparencies except 45 x 107mm 6 x 134cm, and 11 x 14 inches. The maximum enlargement from any transparency is limited to six diameters. Transparencies may be cropped. If this is desired, it is necessary to indicate clearly by an overlay accompanying the transparency.
    Duplicates of transparencies, either enlarged or reduced on film, are also supplied by Eastman Kodak Co."

  2. #22
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjaded View Post
    I have some of those Kotavachrome prints...they are amazing! All of the ones I have are dated between 1955-1956, do you know how long it was made? Talk about glossy!

    Kodak used two early reversal print systems: Minicolor and Kotavochrome.
    However, both used the same print material, which was introduced in 1941, for the Minicolor system.

  3. #23

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    Remember that in the 1940's "serious" photography was done using cameras 4x5 and larger. View cameras in the studio and Speed Graphics for field or action. "Miniature" formats such as 35mm or 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 were only used when conditions warranted or if enlargements would be minimal. Kodachrome Professional was sheet film.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    No. The sheet film Kodachrome was ASA 10 speed. I think it used the K-11 process. It was last seen in the early 1950s. Kodachrome 25 appeared around 1970 and was the first to us process K-14. The Ektachrome from the late 40s and early 50s was ASA 8 and used process E-1.
    K25 and K64, using the K-14 process, came out in 1974. Kodachrome II, ASA 25, and Kodachrome X, ASA 64, both using the K-12 process, preceded them. The K-12 process and KII came out I think about 1961. I'm not sure if KX came out at the same time, but I think it was a little later.

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