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  1. #31
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Corneau View Post
    Thanks Gary - let me emphasize I'm not tearing down his work whatsoever, not one bit.

    Goodness me, neither am I.

    I do like his work irrespective of film or optics used. He's quite obviously very highly skilled and fluent in visual arrangement. Remember he's making a living with his creative craft and we can all learn something from the next professional.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  2. #32
    Scott_Sheppard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Corneau View Post
    There is no way he's getting the focus/bokeh effects he's getting with strictly the lenses listed. No way, José...maybe a 50mm 1.2 or an 85mm 1.2/1.4 -- but not a 2.8 lens.

    Colin:

    He is doing that with a Contax 645 with a 80mm T* f2.0

    All this is done straight up in camera.

    Thanks

    Scott
    Scott Sheppard
    Inside Analog Photo
    http://www.insideanalogphoto.com

  3. #33
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    So far I've not seen anyone here make mention that he probably shoots "one hell of a lot of film", gets it professionally processed, scanned and proofed, and edits it down(just like in the all-film days) before showing his client HIS selects.

    there are some people that I sold film too out here in LA who are VERY similar in style to Jose's approach. They prefer to shoot later in the day(long shadows) and preferably, when the chance arises, to have the subject backlit. Low contrast, spotty saturation and terrific skintones are what they make their money on.

    He also makes mention that he doesn't just capture fleeting moments, but creates a lot of his shots. Somewhat of a collaboration. He has created a style that sells, and appears to sell well. Good for him!

    I'm guessing though that his target market is in the $5-$10k range. Looking at the shots on his blog with the little orange BMW roadster, screamed to me "connesuir of fine things, cameras(in this case Contax 645) and older, vintage automobiles. in particular ones that aren't all that cheap to maintain in that condition. Not to mention that the Contax 645 glass and the Canon gear he shoots with is the highest-contrast designed glass in the world.

    After seeing what a Noritsu or Frontier minilab can really do with a skilled and experienced operator at the helm, I've been really re-thinking getting a nice, wet-mount capable scanner. I might just look at applying to a pro lab here in LA just to learn scanning . Noritsu and Fuji didn't design these things just for the average Costco and Wal-Marts in mind . I believe Richard Photo Labs( the lab he supposedly uses) uses Frontier machines for the bulk of their scanning jobs IIRC.

    its all in the operator. But I'm pretty sure there is some digital-post processing done.

    He probably doesn't even show 50% of his clients on his site, so not all the couples look like models from a hi-end wedding magazine.

    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post

    I am keeping my personal stuff at home. For weddings and "mainstream" portrait work though, I decided that I did not want to do any processing or printing. Farming this work out was one of the most profitable choices I have made in photography.
    Mark, this is what smart business-oriented photogs do from what I've found. I love processing film, gives me plenty of time to listen to some great music, but I prefer to be behind the camera, or with my friends. So there are more important things in life that standing in front of a sink agitating(or JOBO'ing ) your film. I'd prefer to bill the processing straight to the client. And you can sit back and enjoy the benefits. Or shoot another wedding in the meantime .

    -Dan


  4. #34
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    ohh. I've found that I can get a nice, low contrast shot with "just a bit of bite" when I shoot 400h at 125 or 160, and pull a stop in processing. Takes some practice and experimentation to see what YOU like for YOUR work, but in my case, worked out just as I wanted. Subject was partially backlit BTW.

    -Dan


  5. #35

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    If you are sure the man uses film, whatever it is, I'd say that this effect is due to the use of a flashgun with a diffuser of course (we can see the light in their eys even when they are strongly backlit) and an overexposure of the background ( it is all a amatter of control of the f-stop for the subject and the speed for the ambient light..).
    Well how about that???

  6. #36
    Scott_Sheppard's Avatar
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    Hey Everybody...

    If you REALLY want to know just listen to them (they tell all)...

    Jose Villa - http://www.insideanalogphoto.com/ins...jose-villa/114

    Jonathan Canlas - http://www.insideanalogphoto.com/ins...than-canlas/37

    Also both these guys are my friends... any special questions send me and I will get the answers, BOTH of them are OPEN BOOKS !!

    Thanks

    Scott
    Scott Sheppard
    Inside Analog Photo
    http://www.insideanalogphoto.com

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott_Sheppard View Post
    Just listened to this, thanks. It was good, I'm inspired to try something like this.

  8. #38

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    Hello. My name is Jonathan Canlas, and I am the one who's work you are talking about.

    Let me explain how I got this look and what I did. It is rather demystifying so get ready.

    FIRST. There is no LensBaby. I do not own one and no offense to anyone who uses one, I find it quite gimmicky. The reason you have such crazy depth of field is from shooting on a Contax 645 with an 80mm f2 Zeiss lens. Shooting f/2 on this camera is like shooting 1.2 or 1 on a 35mm lens. The focus is REALLY tricky but when you nail it, it is unreal and CAN NOT be reproduced any other way in my opinion. The look of a Contax 645 with the 80mm lens is so distinct.

    The other thing I want to clear up is when you over expose on your film, it does NOT make it more pastel looking. Here is the rule, the more you over expose your film the more CONTRAST and SATURATION you are introducing into your images. And I don't know about you, but SATURATION and CONTRAST are NOT pastel looking to me. The over exposing is my post production done IN CAMERA.

    These images were all overexposed about 1.5-2 stops depending on where I was shooting. All color images were shot on FujiPro 400H. The bw stuff was on Kodak BW400CN and the cross processed Holga stuff was shot on Kodak E100VS and obviously cross processed.

    I develop and scan everything in house. I own my own Noritsu QSF-V30 with a FujiHunt (fuji chemisty) conversion and a Fuji Frontier SP2500. I don't do the scanning myself, I have an employee do that, but that is where the images are scanned, corrected for denisty and color corrected. That is it. There are various setting to bump contrast or retain highlight detail (if you notice I NEVER have blown highlights, EVER). This machine literally lets me have a dynamic range of up to 10 stops in 1 image. Unreal.

    There is no post production of these images. What you see is what you get. No cropping was done. If you have not figured it out, I HATE post processing and sitting in front of a computer. This is one of the main reasons I love film. I show up, shoot, develop/scan/clean dust, and upload the images and I'm done. They are "straight out of camera" other than taken into photoshop and cleaned for dust and scratches. The frontier does not have digital ice so dust is a constant battle.

    I shot 4 rolls of 220, 1 roll of 120 and 1 roll of 35mm. That is usually what I shoot at a family session and then edit it down to around 50 images. This event was edited to 75 as it was 2 families.

    The way I get this look is by shooting Fuji film on a Contax w/80mm f2 shot wide open. That is it. There is no gimmick, there is no crazy post production, there are no actions run, there is nothing but straight out of camera honest images. I used no flash, no reflectors, nothing but my Contax 645 w/ 80mm f2 lens (for color shots), Nikon F5 w/ 50mm 1.4 ZEISS lens and 35mm f/2 Nikkor lens (for the bw shots), and a Holga 120S (for the square cross processed images).

    Film is a magical thing people, you should try it .

  9. #39
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info Jonathan, and welcome to APUG!

    I don't do anything remotely akin to you, but I do enjoy what I can get from 400H and 800 Z straight out of the camera. Okay, straight out of the c41 stabilizer....

    Thanks again for providing your info, that's very helpful.

    Perhaps you could say a few more words about metering? Do you meter off the faces and overexpose per that reading?

    P.S. I apologize for invoking lensbabies; it is a hackneyed look that we see so often in this genre; perhaps I am now seeing it where I shouldn't. Kudo on the fine results form a very fine lens. Too bad contax is no more.
    Last edited by keithwms; 10-21-2009 at 10:22 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #40

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    oh and ps, I NEVER bracket. i have been shooting 400 iso for almost 10 years all on manual settings on my camera (even manual focus, I NEVER use autofocus). and in doing so, I can flat out tell you exposures within 1/2 of a stop. i recently went to bali for a wedding and had NO light meter. i stressed out at first as I ALWAYS have a sekonic l508 around my neck. but i was joking with my friend leo patrone (who shoots 100% film as well) that we should just show up one day to a wedding without light meters. we play games at weddings guessing exposures. and well, it happened.

    i know for a fact that harsh backlit i am going to be shooting f/2 @ 1/4000th of a second. i know it. i know my exposures so there is NEVER a need to bracket or guess what I am doing technically. this frees me up to be as creative as i possibly can without worry about the technical side of things.

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