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  1. #11
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    So please tell me: what is 64T film actually used for?
    The Kodak 64T (EPY) is my favorite color film, due its low contrast, long scale and beautiful color balance. It's available in 120, 4x5, 13x18cm and 8x10 so I can shoot it in any of my cameras. I think the movie industry is the only thing keeping it in production. When it goes, that'll be the saddest day of all for me.

    The Fuji 64T is pretty good, too, but I don't like the color balance as much. It leans a little to the green for my taste. It's definitely sharper than the Kodak.

  2. #12
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    The other nice bit is that the correcting filter to daylight is only 2/3 of a stop. But daylight corrected to tungsten is like 2 stops plus. So 50ish in daylioght, 64 in tungsten , versus say 100 in daylight and 25 or worst under tungsten. I have about 30 rolls of 35mm in the freezer, and feed it into my low end range finder and use it for street photgraphy (leaning aginst a post or product display shelf) when i am inside in malls or stores.
    my real name, imagine that.

  3. #13
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    They are for studio work so that you would not have to filter if you were using tungsten balenced lighting. I love to shoot Ektachrome 64 in daylight (filtered ofcourse). It's a really nice film.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    ...at ISO 64 it's almost worthless for indoor shots if moving supeople [sic] are involved.
    Not only is that statement a given for any slow- or medium-speed film, but that is also a huge if. There are plenty of things to shoot aside from indoor hand held shots of moving people...right? They make different films because there are many types of photographs taken by many different photographers with different tastes...right? You know what a tripod is and how to use one...right? So, I do not understand the thought that the film has no use just because you can't use it for your desired application. That's like saying that your cargo van is no good on the curves at Sears Point, so you can't see what use a cargo van has at all.

    The Fuji is my favorite color film (and I like the Kodak too). It is one of the most beautiful films ever produced, IMHO. Amazing accurate color, super sharp, easily manipulated via exposure and processing, great for long exposures, great for night photography, studio still life and product photography, interiors, night cityscapes, shots with mixed lighting, copy work, making portfolio transparencies, even for portraits if you use enough light. Would I try to use it for indoor handheld shots of moving people? Of course not! You don't need to be Sherlock Holmes to figure that out. If you don't have a use for it, then don't use it. Nobody is twisting your arm...but you should try some if you ever do any of the things I mentioned above.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 10-22-2009 at 05:11 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #15

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    Kodak Ektachrome 64T is/was a perfect long exposure film, with filter for daylight.
    No colour shift, like the daylight balanced Ektachrome 64 exhibited in heaps when you went longer than 1/2 sec.

  6. #16
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Thanks to all those who replied. A number of points have been raised in favour of 64T films, some were new to me and very interesting, some others were a little hard to follow for me. A number of folks mentioned copy work and product shots, which makes a lot of sense, since continuous light is cheap, much easier to set up and longer exposure times are a non-issue there. Cine work is obviously another task where continuous lights are the only option, and film emulsions from there may spill over into our territory.

    What I still wonder is why only such slow film is made for tungsten balance. I realize there existed some 320T a while back, but evidently only 64T films are available now. I can positively confirm that portrait work is at least a royal pain with tungsten lights and ISO 64 film: I got 1/15s @ F/11 when I shone 2 500W halogen lights directly from 1m distance at some test subject, needless to say I did not even bother putting real humans in such a setup.

    Don't get me wrong, I never questioned whether there were legitimate uses for this type of film, I just wanted to find out what these are (and evidently others were curious as well). I am here to learn and I'm glad I learned something here.

  7. #17

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    Like most of the good stuff, it went away because we live in a "free" economic market, and nobody bought it. Nothing matters in the "economically developed" world except what people buy. Good things go away if nobody buys them...so GO BUY SOME.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #18
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Kodak Ektachrome 64T is/was a perfect long exposure film, with filter for daylight.
    No colour shift, like the daylight balanced Ektachrome 64 exhibited in heaps when you went longer than 1/2 sec.
    Another great feature of 64T (Kodak anyway-does Fuji's do the same thing?) - there's negligible need for reciprocity failure correction out to 100 seconds.

  9. #19
    gandolfi's Avatar
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    Fuji RTP 64 II has for a long time been my favourite colour film - for portraits - stills and fashion...

    (I have never been a friend of the Kodak.. maybe because I paint with light, and the FUJI reacts so much better in this technique...)

    look at the attachments.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails farve-(26).jpg   farve-(27).jpg  

  10. #20
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    I realize there existed some 320T a while back
    Hideous. So was the 160T. Nothing at all like the 64s.

    Try some. You'll love it. Filter it with an 85B in daylight. Use a speed of 40.

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