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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    Another great feature of 64T (Kodak anyway-does Fuji's do the same thing?) - there's negligible need for reciprocity failure correction out to 100 seconds.
    Fuji's is even better. No correction out to four minutes according to the data sheet. In practice, I find that it is actually good out to at least 15 (just like Provia 100 and Astia). Fuji transparency films are amazing in this respect. (I have not tried long exposures with any of the Velvias.)
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #22
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi View Post
    Fuji RTP 64 II has for a long time been my favourite colour film - for portraits - stills and fashion...

    (I have never been a friend of the Kodak.. maybe because I paint with light, and the FUJI reacts so much better in this technique...)

    look at the attachments.
    Breathtaking as always, Emil. Do you use a 3200°K light to paint?

  3. #23
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Fuji's is even better. No correction out to four minutes according to the data sheet. In practice, I find that it is actually good out to at least 15 (just like Provia 100 and Astia). Fuji transparency films are amazing in this respect. (I have not tried long exposures with any of the Velvias.)
    I think I need to revisit the Fuji tungsten chromes. I haven't used it for about 8 years. There probably have been many advances made with it.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    Hideous. So was the 160T. Nothing at all like the 64s.
    I must beg to differ....wonderful, wonderful stuff. Two of the best films I ever used. Come to think of it, I could say the same thing of every tungsten film I have used, but these two were my favorites.

    320T and 160T were some of my favorite and most used films. The film discontinuation that hit hardest for me was 320T. I used at least 6 or 8 rolls of it per week for shooting in low light at shows and various other events. I would use the 160T in my 645 with the f/1.9 lens. You could push this film to your heart's content in medium format. I would shoot normal if I could, but usually pushed, based on my spot meter readings. I have since switched to Press 800 or digital SLR (10D) as an alternative...but they are not the same at all. I still have two pro packs of 120 160T stashed. I went through my 320T already...alas...
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    I've been wondering the same. Kodak and Fuji have great high-speed tungsten-balanced motion picture negative films, like the new Vision3 500T that can be pushed well to 1000 or even more. It's a shame that similar products are not available as C-41 or E-6 films. Especially a modern-technology 400 speed tungsten-balanced slide film would be so nice.
    Where on Earth can one get push processing for ECN-II color neg film?

  6. #26
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Wpositive View Post
    Where on Earth can one get push processing for ECN-II color neg film?
    Better yet, where on earth can one get processing for ECN-II color neg film? You could do it yourself if you ordered 50 gallons of developer concentrate and enjoyed gunking up your dark closet with remjet backing.

  7. #27
    keithwms's Avatar
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    I adore fuji 64T, the newer one. Fantastic colours, very accurate. It is a very useful film for ~3200 K light. I have used it quite a bit for outdoor night architecture; here is an example. I also like it for colour still-life stuff. For star trails, by the way, it is the *best* colour film in my opinion- the sky becomes a really glorious blue; here is an example. Is it for motion, no, but neither are a lot of things.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #28
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Wpositive View Post
    Where on Earth can one get push processing for ECN-II color neg film?
    C-41 films just develop to completion and that's it. Only color chrome films can be expanded with extended time in the first developer.

    Personally, I don't believe that push processing is possible with any film. Just expanded contrast through extended development. For all practical purposes the shadows are going to remain about the same density no matter what you do.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    C-41 films just develop to completion and that's it. Only color chrome films can be expanded with extended time in the first developer.

    Personally, I don't believe that push processing is possible with any film. Just expanded contrast through extended development. For all practical purposes the shadows are going to remain about the same density no matter what you do.
    Of course C-41 films, and not E-6 films alone, can be expanded via pushing. Haven't you ever done it?

    Despite your personal beliefs, push processing is possible with any film I can think of. Of course what you describe in your second paragraph is the case. That is what pushing does. That is what pushing is; making the film more contrasty. It is not a magic way to make your film faster across the board. Everybody knows that...hopefully.

    ECN-II films are push processed fairly frequently in the MP industry for the same reasons it is done with still pix: to increase contrast, increase grain, etc. It is not an odd thing to have movie film pushed. I do not know where to get short rolls of MP film processed any more. A and I quit doing it.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 10-22-2009 at 09:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  10. #30
    Terrence Brennan's Avatar
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    Fuji 64T film

    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    A number of folks mentioned copy work and product shots, which makes a lot of sense, since continuous light is cheap, much easier to set up and longer exposure times are a non-issue there. Cine work is obviously another task where continuous lights are the only option, and film emulsions from there may spill over into our territory..
    I used to use Fuji 64T film to make copies slides on a tungsten-lit copy stand, and as well as indoor exhibit photography (after hours). The film almost always required supplementary filtration; typically I would add something like CC10B + CC5C on the copy stand, and an 82A or 82B, plus a CC10B, for exhibit photography, AFAIR.

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