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  1. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    Putting ISO aside, the results should be comparable in quality. All the light effects we care about are linear in nature, so linear filters should be able to properly compensate all common color temperatures. The only limit is light sensitivity of the film material, and here day light balanced film wins.
    Putting ISO aside, you end up believing that ISO is the only difference?


    Try a roll of tungsten balanced and a roll of daylight balanced film.
    Compare how both perform, with appropriate filter, on each other's turf.
    ISO is not the only difference.

  2. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    What colour is the night?

    Depends.
    Assuming that most light you'll see at night is unnatural, a tungsten balanced film without filter might seem good. But artificial light itself comes in so many forms and colours that it is hard to get the colour right with either daylight or tungsten film, with or without filter.

    Using moonlight only, a daylight balanced film would be a better match. Were it not that with the long exposures needed, colour goes haywire anyway.
    I meant if I wanted to do long exposures, would I need the 85b filter to do that.

  3. #73
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    I think that's exactly what happened with Velvia 50 some years ago.
    IIRC, the original Velvia was discontinued for environmentally-detrimental reasons (in the manufacturing). It wasn't that it was not selling, in fact, it was the opposite.

    But when they re-introduced it a year(2?) or so back, it was re-formulated to be more safe to the environment when being manufactured. In terms of by-products.

    some still claim that the old stuff was way better than the new stuff.


  4. #74
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    oh....

    I noticed that no one mentioned (film-recorders) in the myriad of uses for this wonderful film. Some labs used it for outputting digital files to film (Kodak LVT, etc...)

    being that its tungsten balanced, and the recording laser works in the tungsten color spectrum. the two work out very nicely as a combo.

    One photog I know of here in LA (who shoots digital for most of her work), outputs her best and most selected work(fully edited) to 4x5 and 8x10 transparencies. they look funny when on a lightbox, cause they don't have the normal rebate area like regular film.

    kind of a reverse-hybrid method

    -Dan


  5. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by RGS122 View Post
    I meant if I wanted to do long exposures, would I need the 85b filter to do that.
    Long exposures in daylight? Depending on how long (Schwarzschild): yes.
    Long exposures in twilight? The same (that is: a conversion filter, though not necessarily the 85B).
    Long exposures when there is no natrual light at all? Hard to say.

  6. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Long exposures in daylight? Depending on how long (Schwarzschild): yes.
    Long exposures in twilight? The same (that is: a conversion filter, though not necessarily the 85B).
    Long exposures when there is no natrual light at all? Hard to say.
    Oh ok, so I think I should experiment with the roll of 64T I have and see what works best. Since I bought the filter I plan on buying more T sensitive film so that roll wouldn't be a waste for me.

  7. #77
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    Putting ISO aside, you end up believing that ISO is the only difference?


    Try a roll of tungsten balanced and a roll of daylight balanced film.
    Compare how both perform, with appropriate filter, on each other's turf.
    ISO is not the only difference.
    There may be a difference in practice, but there is no need for there being one. This is not magic. Tungsten light differs from day light in the distribution of power density over wave length, and a suitable filter should be able to even this out. Chances are that 80A doesn't compensate well, and looking at the transmission curves from the heliopan filters I posted before, this is certainly far away from a perfect compensation filter for any incandescent light spectrum. The next question is obviously "what is the spectrum of day light anyway?", since this in turn depends on daytime, season, weather, altitude and latitude.

    So what's my point? It is hard to believe for me that any film can yield perfect colors in any standard setup, unless the setup is deliberately matched to the film type. We may (and most of the time do) accept the look of our resulting slides as good or adequate, but few to none of us know the exact spectral composition of all light sources involved, the exact spectral response of the film emulsion (ideally the batch lot we're using), and the spectral transmission curves of all filters and the lens. With carefully selected filters one has at least a chance to get accurate colors (up to the limits of the film used). This may turn out to be a lot more complex than just slapping an 80A in front of my lens, and tungsten balanced film may indeed accomplish the task much easier, I just take your word for it.

    BTW I just ran a roll of 64T with halogen light and the results after scanning look comparable to Astia 100 in day light. I hope I'll get that pack of Provia 400X soon, so I can try the same with an 80A filter in front. I will report about the results.

  8. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    What colour is the night?

    Depends.
    Assuming that most light you'll see at night is unnatural, a tungsten balanced film without filter might seem good. But artificial light itself comes in so many forms and colours that it is hard to get the colour right with either daylight or tungsten film, with or without filter.

    Using moonlight only, a daylight balanced film would be a better match. Were it not that with the long exposures needed, colour goes haywire anyway.
    I use daylight film with an 80b filter when I'm doing traffic trails at night.

  9. #79
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I use tungsten film for night photography. It gave a better color balance.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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