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  1. #1
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    What's the point of 64T film?

    I understand this film is color balanced for tungsten light, but at ISO 64 it's almost worthless for indoor shots if moving supeople are involved. The exposure times you get at reasonable apertures are too long even if you point construction lights directly at the subjects from close range. Flashes are obviously not an option since they spit out day light balanced light. For still objects it may be easier to mess around with color correction filters. Grain size of 64T is comparable to modern daylight balanced ISO 400 slide film.

    There must be more than fringe use since Fuji even introduced a new emulsion some years ago. So please tell me: what is 64T film actually used for?

  2. #2
    hrst's Avatar
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    I've been wondering the same. Kodak and Fuji have great high-speed tungsten-balanced motion picture negative films, like the new Vision3 500T that can be pushed well to 1000 or even more. It's a shame that similar products are not available as C-41 or E-6 films. Especially a modern-technology 400 speed tungsten-balanced slide film would be so nice.

  3. #3
    tim_walls's Avatar
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    I thought 64T emulsions were intended for cine cameras, where continuous (tungsten) lighting would be involved.


    That may just be entirely my imagination, though.
    Another day goes under; a little bourbon will take the strain...

  4. #4

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    With the camera on a copy stand with 120w flood lamps (3200k) it will yield excellent results for copy work and small objects. Why mess with filters if that film will do the job it is best for?

  5. #5
    hrst's Avatar
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    No, cine films are different. Negative films in process ECN-2 are used. KODAK's range is 50D, 100T, 200T, 250D, 500T and there was 800T. ISO values in cine may be a little lower, so according to some people, 250D in cine can be almost the same as 400 ISO C-41 film.

    There are also reversal cine films but again, they are different from still films.

    Copy work is indeed where you use this 64T still film.

  6. #6
    wildbill's Avatar
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    I don't think fuji had "construction lights" in mind when they introduced this film. Using tungsten units made for cinema/still lighting with this film works just fine. Also, look up the film's reciprocity characteristics.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  7. #7

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    I'm not sure how it is for others, but I can tell you what we us it for. Most of all it is for copy work in a few different forms. Copy slides of old prints to be reproduced is how we use it in 35mm. But, our biggest use was 4x5 shots of art work. The film has about the nicest and true to color reproduction value of any film we have tested for this purpose. It works very well and we are not using expensive lighting. Can lights with 3200 photo bulbs, cross polarized and get a nice exposure at our lenses prime spot (debatable, I'm sure).

    35mm; 50mm lens F5.6-8 split @ ¼ sec
    4x5; G-Claron 210mm 1/3 past F22 @ 8 sec.

    It's what works for us to match color to color.

  8. #8
    Dave Swinnard's Avatar
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    Tungsten balanced films were also used by architectural photographers for shooting some interiors back in the days before digital processing allowed for (easy) white balancing.

    A selection of film (neg or reversal, daylight or tungsten) and a bag of colour correction and colour balance filters (for camera and lights and windows) was pretty common and allowed the photographer to meet all lighting situations. (mostly...sometimes...)

    Dave

  9. #9
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    It has long been my choice for photographing paintings and table top ("product") setups; though I admit my current trend is toward "alternate technology" as many of my final results are for the web.

  10. #10
    tim_walls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    No, cine films are different. Negative films in process ECN-2 are used. KODAK's range is 50D, 100T, 200T, 250D, 500T and there was 800T. ISO values in cine may be a little lower, so according to some people, 250D in cine can be almost the same as 400 ISO C-41 film.

    There are also reversal cine films but again, they are different from still films.

    Copy work is indeed where you use this 64T still film.
    Ahh, fair enough. I never use colour negative film so I sort of completely forget the stuff exists. The only 64T films I've got are regular E6 process in Super8 cartridges.
    Another day goes under; a little bourbon will take the strain...

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