Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,587   Posts: 1,545,855   Online: 1130
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    5

    How to use Provia 400

    Most of my photography is urban street, and most of it is relatively contained contrast within a dynamic range of +-2 stops. My film of choise is 400 ASA colour neg. Depending on the lighting and what I want to do with shutter speed and lens opening I set the meter to anywhere from 200 to 800 ASA and the results meet my needs. Most of the time the meter is set to 400 ASA.

    So I can easily use Porvia 400 and have it meet my needs most of the time but it costs more to buy and process so I just have not bothered with it.

    I now find my self with a couple of rolls of it and I am looking for suggestions on how to make best use of it outside of my normal use of film and maybe expand my horizons in the future.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    284
    I would use Portra 400VC or another color negative film. I don't know that Provia 400X will provide specific benefits to you here. It is more expensive to buy and process. It has less exposure latitude to help you recover from exposure errors. I probably has more grain than a color negative film of the same speed.

    I use Provia 400X in MF for my stereo shots. I need a slide film and 400X is the only 400 speed in the game. I don't use it for anything else.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    257
    Quote Originally Posted by amuderick View Post
    I would use Portra 400VC or another color negative film. I don't know that Provia 400X will provide specific benefits to you here. It is more expensive to buy and process. It has less exposure latitude to help you recover from exposure errors. I probably has more grain than a color negative film of the same speed.
    On the other hand, colors tend to be snappier with slide film, which may or may not be what you are after. To me, slides just have a 'dazzle' to them which I have NEVER seen in C41 film. Also, Provia 400 has somewhat better exposure latitude than Provia 100 (and less garish colors). And if you scan, most people prefer scanning slides vs negatives (don't know where you fall in here). As for grain, Provia 400 is actually rated at 11 RMS, which is not bad at all for an ISO400 film (not sure how this compares with ISO400 negative film). Especially when you consider that most ISO100 E6 films are 8 RMS. And to top it off, you can always have a slide show (not possible with C41!).

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by StorminMatt View Post
    On the other hand, colors tend to be snappier with slide film, which may or may not be what you are after. To me, slides just have a 'dazzle' to them which I have NEVER seen in C41 film. Also, Provia 400 has somewhat better exposure latitude than Provia 100 (and less garish colors). And if you scan, most people prefer scanning slides vs negatives (don't know where you fall in here). As for grain, Provia 400 is actually rated at 11 RMS, which is not bad at all for an ISO400 film (not sure how this compares with ISO400 negative film). Especially when you consider that most ISO100 E6 films are 8 RMS. And to top it off, you can always have a slide show (not possible with C41!).
    Its true about the scanning it has been a pain scanning negs to get the colour right. Up to now I have been using Fuji color. I scan with Vuescan software and the programs profiles for these films are sparse however Kodak films are well covered by the program and I understand that Ektar 100 scans real well. (great talk for a Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry section of the forums) I've used most of my fujicolor film and I now have a food saver container filled with kodak neg films in my fridge along with a couple of rolls of provia 400x. The other thing with slide film is that the emulsion is harder to scratch. Negs must be handled with much more care.

    With the Provia I guess I should be looking for projects with lots of bright colours.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Shooter
    35mm Pan
    Posts
    20
    I guess it doesnt matter that much what you shoot if you just scan them... But for analog use (which this forum is mostly concentrated on) they sure have their differences that are clear.

    Slides look very different than negs anyway. They have more contrast unless the negs are printed very contrasticly. Ilfochrome has its advantages towards RA-4 -prints, but is lot more expensive and not as common as a process.

    Generally I would say slide films look less grainy. You cannot compare the RMS values straight, because negative films have so much less contrast and the RMS is not compatible between these film types.
    Negatives have more latitude towards "over"exposure, but they might have very grainy shadows if you have not much light. With slide film the blacks are quite clean actually, so it might be an advantage in the dark. This is something that most people fail to mention when talking about exposing negatives vs. slides. It is also commonly said that slides are so hard to expose, but I don't think it is that hard really.

    For scanning, I can just say it's often not too easy to tune your process to give you best results automatically. You get all the tones out of a neg more easily than the dense slide films, but the colours often need more work. You probably should make the decision to get a certain result, not just for the work needed for some final image.

  6. #6
    Scott_Sheppard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    273
    Hello Everybody:

    Go listen to this:

    http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/M...5&id=291806626

    Enjoy

    Thanks

    Scott
    Scott Sheppard
    Inside Analog Photo
    http://www.insideanalogphoto.com

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Shooter
    35mm Pan
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott_Sheppard View Post
    Sorry, could you tell us a bit more what it is about before we (like me who yet dont have it...) download itunes to only to listen to it (and wait for the file to load etc..) ?

    It would help to know it is worth the trouble at all .

  8. #8
    Scott_Sheppard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    273
    Hey:

    It is a program with Photo Engineer Ron Mowrey about POS vrs NEG film.

    And for some STRANGE reason you dont have iTunes, You can listen here as well....

    http://www.insideanalogphoto.com/ins...n-mowrey-2/223

    Enjoy
    Scott Sheppard
    Inside Analog Photo
    http://www.insideanalogphoto.com

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Shooter
    35mm Pan
    Posts
    20
    Thank you! Sounds interesting and even better if I dont have to download iTunes (never needed it so far)

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    812
    I would use Superia X-Tra 400 for this or Portra 400VC.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin