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  1. #1
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Exposing Kodachrome 40 in daylight.

    I have about six rolls of K14 proccess Kodachrome 40. I plan on exposing it in daylight using a Wratten 85C filter. I understand that this may be a little warm, so do you have any suggestions as to what I should do? Also, How should I adjust my exposure when using this filter?
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  2. #2
    Lee L's Avatar
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    The 85C does less correction than the 85, so you'll be a couple of hundred degrees Kelvin cooler than fully corrected, not warmer.

    Lee

  3. #3

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    Lee is right. 85 is the "correct" filter to use. 85B (which is a little stronger) can also be a good choice when shooting in the shade or in cloudy weather; that would be roughly equivalent to using 81B with daylight film. I would not recommend 85C.

  4. #4
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    85A is the kodachrome filter. Kodachrome 40 is not tungsten, it's Type A or whatever, or a few hundred degrees cooler than tungsten. The 85B will make it a little warm (which is not bad especially on cloudy days when kodachrome is unhappy) The 85C is not your filter.

  5. #5
    Lee L's Avatar
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    There is no single tungsten temperature. It radiates a differently balanced spectrum depending on how much current it's carrying and its exact composition. The color temperature is based on black body radiation and the balance of the spectrum at given temperatures on the Kelvin scale. There are A and B films, both tungsten, A=3400 Kelvin and B=3200 Kelvin.

    Household tungsten lamps vary in color temperature with wattage, mostly in the 2750-2900K range.

    Kodachrome 40 is definitely Tungsten Type A, balanced for 3400K illumination.

    The 85 and 85A filters are the same, although I've seen some internet sources (perhaps correct, perhaps not) that say the Cokin 85 and 85A are different by several hundred Kelvin.

    Lee



 

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