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  1. #1

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    First E6 negatives no good

    I just developed some E6 negatives for the first time, and they came out horribly. Just about every variable is an unknown, but before I run more does anyone have any guesses?

    First of all, the variables: First time developing E6 (Arista Rapid E6 3-bath kit), first time shooting 4x5 (Fuji Provia 100F film), first time using camera (Polaroid 95, individual sheet loaded in a changing bag), first time using flash (flash bulb, GE #5), developed in Jobo CPE2, taped gently into a drum that doesn't support 4x5... could have moved.

    So, now that I look sufficiently stupid, the results: two extremely dark negatives that, when held up to the light, show a very faint red scene. Pure red, very dark. The frame markers on the film are yellow and look normal.

    Any clues as to how many things went wrong? Next batch is some rolls of 120 from a camera I actually know how to use in a drum that actually supports it, but I want to make sure this doesn't suggest bad chemicals.

  2. #2
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Maybe you shot the film backwards. Are you sure the emulsion side was towards the lens?

  3. #3
    hrst's Avatar
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    Yeah, the red-sensitive layer is on the bottom and there's an antihalation layer, so very dim red images with perfect yellow frame markers sounds like you have exposed it thru the film base.

  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I agree. Red transparencies usually mean the film was loaded upside down.

    When you load the film, in the vertical orientation, the emulsion side will be up when the notch is in the upper right or lower left hand corner. I usually load with the flap end down darkslide end up and the film notch in the lower left hand corner, so that if for some reason I lose track of what film is loaded (not likely, since I label the film holders, but anyway), I can feel the notches in the dark without having to unload the film completely.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  5. #5

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    Ok, excellent, that's very likely. As I was loading it I realized I didn't remember which way the notches were supposed to be. I'll give the 120 a go tonight then.

    Thanks!

  6. #6
    Leighgion's Avatar
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    Definitely sounds like an accidental redscaling.

  7. #7

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    It does sound like you loaded the sheets into the holders backwards. The notch codes are on the top right corner when the emulsion is facing you.
    Frank Schifano

  8. #8
    gephoto's Avatar
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    I for one would like to hear how your 120 E-6 process run goes. In part because I am wanting to know how the Arista E-6 chemistry stacks up to Tetenal E-6. Does any one know how they compare? Anyway, good luck and do let us know. I appreciate that you are sharing a failure that we can all learn from!

  9. #9

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    I have nothing to compare the results to, but the colors on the two rolls of 120 look good. A lot of the slides are underexposed, but I didn't have a meter so that's not too shocking. The ones that are properly exposed are quite beautiful. I've never shot slides before, so the best I can offer is that the kit was inexpensive and extremely easy to work with. It does have a combined 'blix', which people around here tend to frown on.

  10. #10
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    You'll find that shooting 4x5 without a meter is a lot more expensive in wasted film and effort processing it in the long run than with one, you can buy good used meters second hand for a song and there are plenty of members on this site to advise you which ones are worth having. I know you're new to slide film but transparency films like Fuji Provia 100F processed in E6 chemistry make positives not negatives, and an important thing for you to be aware of is that with reversal slide films the more exposure you give the film the lighter it gets, which is the opposite of negative print films.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 11-05-2009 at 10:40 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

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