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  1. #11
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    No, three strip Technicolor is long gone. Also the processing equipment that was used to make the prints was sold to China decades ago. Three strip Technicolor cameras still exist, but since the printing equipment is gone they are close to useless. You probably could scan all three strips digitally and assemble your color image that way, but the cost would be prohibitive.

    Technicolor still exists as a lab and provides all sorts of services to the movie industry. They process normal movie film these days.

    A few years ago Technicolor developed something called Technicolor IB. Basically they used a normal one strip negative to produce something that looked similar to the old Technicolor prints (which were made from 3-negative strips)

    I went to a test screening at the Technicolor lab and they showed us some very impressive IB prints. Deep blacks, reds that were really red. They made Technicolor IB prints for the restored Vertigo (stunning) and a few other movies. But it never really took off.

    Around the same time Kodak introduced their new line of Vision filmstocks for negative and prints. Vision and Vision2 were a huge leap forward in quality over the older materials. Rich blacks, punchy colors, finer grain etc.. That didn't help Technicolor IB.

    In the meanwhile digital projection has also matured and the whole concept of traditional prints is coming in to question.

    The good news is that a few people have developed ways to emulate the look of the Technicolor process digitally. Ironically it works best with digitally captured material.

    But the old Technicolor prints are a sight to behold. Films like "The Red Shoes" are simply jaw dropping in TC.

  2. #12
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    Well, technically, a type of Technicolor may be the last color motion picture product standing at the end of the fight between digital and analog. Almost all film classics are being mastered as 3 color separations on B&W film. They are then stored that way due to the extreme life expectancy of B&W films. The 3 color separations would then, some day, be printed onto a color stock or digitally reproduced to present the original of some great classic motion pictures.

    PE

  3. #13
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    PE,

    I remember hearing that disney did this will all their classics, Snow White, etc...

    but instead of b/w 35mm M/P stock, they made it on 8 or 9" roll film. yes, I definitely remember hearing 8 or 9" wide long roll film for b/w color separations.

    do you see this as possible?

    -Dan


  4. #14
    AgX
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    In a Thompson financial report from 2002 I found this:

    Thomson multimedia has decided to exit the Dye Transfer business acquired as part of
    Technicolor transaction. The net book value of the Dye Transfer equipment was written down to fair
    market value, determined to be zero. Under French GAAP, the indirect costs expected to be non-recurring
    if the activity ceased (i.e. utilities and rent) have been recorded under ‘‘Other income and
    expense’’. Under U.S GAAP, the Dye Transfer activity does not qualify as discontinued operations
    under APB 30 and the results during the period March 17, 2001 to December 31, 2001 should be
    reflected as gross in the income statement, leading to the reclassification of €2 million from ‘‘Other
    expenses’’ to ‘‘Operating expenses’’.
    Last edited by AgX; 11-09-2009 at 04:04 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielStone View Post
    PE,

    I remember hearing that disney did this will all their classics, Snow White, etc...

    but instead of b/w 35mm M/P stock, they made it on 8 or 9" roll film. yes, I definitely remember hearing 8 or 9" wide long roll film for b/w color separations.

    do you see this as possible?

    -Dan
    Not sure about the 8 or 9", but the original negatives for a lot of the disney animations, beginning with Fantasia were shot on standard B&W stock, but as 3 frame sequential. Made for simpler kit, and as it was animation no issues with colour registration when shooting live action.

    Of course in those days that would have been nitrate stock, and that can be a little *ahem* temperamental
    "Flatter Me, and I May Not Believe You. Criticize Me, and I May Not like You. Ignore Me, and I May Not Forgive You. Encourage Me, and I Will Not Forget You."

  6. #16
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Well, IDK what size stock Disney used, but the originals are certainly on B&W stock. Although many of the old originals are on nitrate stock unfortunately, and are in rather poor condition because of that. George Eastman House has a huge collection of originnals stored in their vaults.

    PE

  7. #17

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    When people talk about Technicolor they usually mean Technicolor process 4 or 5. The earlier processes (1 through 3) were two-color processes, and thus did not record a full color spectrum.

    Process 4 is known as three-strip Technicolor. It was in use from 1932 until the mid 1950s. A big camera with a beam splitter and color filters recorded the scene on three separate B&W film strips. These separation negatives were contact printed onto so called matrix stock which was in turn used for making dye transfer prints. These prints are also known as IB prints, after the equipment used to make them, or dye imbibition prints. They are stunningly beautiful.

    Process 5 was used from the early 1950s until the mid 1970s in the USA and the late 1970s in the UK. A normal movie camera was used for principal photography, and it recorded onto Eastman color negative film. Matrices for dye transfer were made from the color negative, and then IB prints were manufactured just like before.

    When Technicolor abandoned dye transfer printing in the 1970s, the equipment was sold to China, where the process was used well into the 1990s. Not anymore, though.

    Technicolor briefly revived dye transfer printing in the late 1990s. The process was adapted for printing onto polyester stock instead of acetate, but there were problems with obtaining consistent quality, and it was again abandoned after a few short years.

  8. #18

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    I think Saving Private Ryan and Peal Harbour were shot in Technicolor.

  9. #19
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    no, what I meant by 8 or 9" was when they copied the originals to make NEW master negatives, did they use larger film to make larger separation negatives in addition to the original nitate negs?


    great info coming out of all the holes here ! keep it coming. I do remember hearing something about Pearl Harbor being shot or recorded on Technicolor. I'll have to read into that one a bit more. Not my favorite movie though, Saving Ryan's Privates(oops ) was much better interpretation of WWII IMO, at least from a purely historical standpoint

    -Dan


  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ajuk View Post
    I think Saving Private Ryan and Peal Harbour were shot in Technicolor.
    They were shot on color negative film, just like any other production. Technicolor made dye transfer prints of Pearl Harbour (and possibly Saving Private Ryan, I'm not 100% sure), and this is probably what you're thinking of. It is not meaningful to talk of movies being "shot in Technicolor", unless you mean they were shot using the three-strip camera, but this has not been done since the 1950s.

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