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  1. #41
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    An important point got lost here - Technicolor was a company and also a series of processes. I'm afraid all are gone now.
    The company Technicolor is still around. It has about 13,000 employees and amongst other activities is still offering cine-lab services.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    I don't think asinine is accurate.
    Maybe the word I was after is laborious.

    When they say scan The Wizard of Oz forx example for BD or DVD do they use a print of the original 3 strips of film?

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    It can be very confusing to those who are not familiar with the many different combinations of labs and lab services the cinema industry uses. Color by DeLuxe, for instance, means a standard Eastmancolor film printed at DeLuxe labs. Color by Technicolor may mean a Dye Transfer print (in the past) or just a standard Eastmancolor print, produced by the Technicolor lab., as they did both for many many years. Some films may have prints made by several labs, one of which might be Technicolor, and at one time those made at the Technicolor lab may have been their Dye Transfer process. One can usually tell, at least on older films, by visual examination of the print (holding the film in your hands). Technicolor prints have a different look to them. Metrocolor, DeLuxe, and others were just standard film processing operations using common Eastman, Agfa and Fuji filmstocks.

    Also, films shot with the original Technicolor cameras using the 3 b/w negative rolls, can be and are often printed onto standard Eastmancolor film stocks. Any new film prints of subjects such as The Wizard of Oz, Gone With The Wind, etc, would be on Kodak print films, even though these productions were designed to be printed by the Technicolor process.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by ajuk View Post
    Maybe the word I was after is laborious.

    When they say scan The Wizard of Oz forx example for BD or DVD do they use a print of the original 3 strips of film?

    They will often make a brand new print on current Kodak film stocks from which to derive the digital master.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    They will often make a brand new print on current Kodak film stocks from which to derive the digital master.
    This makes no sense. Source for this?

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    This makes no sense. Source for this?

    http://digitalcontentproducer.com/ma...son_restoring/

  7. #47
    AgX
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    Well, they made a master negative from their digital files for two reasons: the archival issue and the economics of digitally printing a master negative from which directly or via internegatives the final release prints are printed.
    That however copies are made especially for telecine is strange to me. It would mean that there are still stations that cannot handle data files.
    I got the answer: that article is from 2000.

  8. #48
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    This case includes both direct scanning of original separations, and making traditional analog (optical or contact) print that is scanned or telecined afterwards.

    This is from 1999, so I'm not surprised. Scanning was called telecining and used more expensive and inferior technology compared to today's --- analog lab operations still being the mainstream way to do things, including telecining. Due to limited dynamic range of telecine CCD's, usually they made special positive prints on telecine film stock, having lower contrast and Dmax than theatrical release print films, to match the dynamic range of CCD's and camera tubes. (See: http://motion.kodak.com/US/en/motion...on/h12395t.htm )

    So, they used this older telecining technology for most rolls, and digitized the original seps directly for one roll. (And then exposed digital files to film with expensive laser printer, processed it, and digitized again. Does this sound wise? Nope. It's probably not done this way anymore.)

    Although I'm not sure about this, I would believe that nowadays digital scans of three-strip separations are supposedly made directly from the very first negatives whenever possible (just like they did for roll 1A on the given case), because every analog duplicating stage (optical or contact) will lose some image detail and will also cost extra; as scanning and digital postprocessing is not rocket science anymore. If you have some other information about the current situation, please provide a bit more recent source.
    Last edited by hrst; 11-18-2009 at 11:22 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #49
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    Up to 11 intermediate stages are used to produce complex special effects. Then they are projected on the wide screen. They seem pretty sharp to me. The films (camera, interneg and print) were designed to retain a constant tone scale, sharpness and grain through multi stage processes.

    At one time, Kodak made a masked positive film for direct production of a dupe negative from the master camera roll. This film failed in the market IIRC.

    PE

  10. #50
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    In older films (from the 60's) effects like crossfade can dramatically reduce sharpness and affect tone scale, which can be seen even in small picture on TV. I actually like the effect .

    Here is a study about sharpness loss in multiple generations using modern films:
    http://www.cst.fr/IMG/pdf/35mm_resolution_english.pdf

    So yes, they are quite good. Still I would guess that today the separations are scanned directly for the easiness and price, if the target is only a digital blu-ray or DVD release.

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