Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,279   Posts: 1,534,850   Online: 737
      
Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 57
  1. #1
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,962
    Images
    1

    Is technicolor still used at all?

    Somehow, I don't think so.

    But I wanted to check none the less. I'm a nerd I guess, cause I stay after the movie's done just to see what the film was shot on, Fuji, Kodak, Panavision, etc....


    being that Technicolor is a color separation process, isn't the color *more accurate* than the current methods of shooting color neg film and then scanning, and re-outputting to reversal film for display?

    -Dan


  2. #2
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,962
    Images
    1
    *more accurate* from a color at the time of capture, I meant.

    -Dan


  3. #3
    wildbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,386
    Images
    140
    Technicolor isn't used anymore but I believe I saw a lawrence of arabia screening here a few years back projected in 3 strip technicolor. Of course, the lab Technicolor still exists.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  4. #4
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tufts University
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,750
    Images
    5
    I'm fairly sure it's the exact same thing. After all, color film is three layers of black and white film in one. Reversal film is less accurate because it isn't masked. I know that the technicolor printing process where they used dye transfer was restarted in the 90s because the look was popular. Toy Story was one of the movies that utilized it. The cameras are probably in museums or something. You can replicate technicolor for yourself using a panchromatic black and white film and three filters. By shooting three frames, one though a red, green and blue filter, and then combining those in photoshop or using screen printing or something like that, you can create a color image using just black and white film. I did it and it was pretty cool.

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    To reproduce accurate color, the capture process needs to include some method of masking to correct for unwanted color absorptions of the dyes. No positive system, to my knowledge, uses one. IDK if Technicolor did.

    But, in addition to that, Pos-Pos reproduction is a "lossy" system that compresses data in the toe and shoulder during the print process. Neg-Pos processes are not and therefore survive multiple duplications without loss.

    So, in regard to the OP, the color is not more accurate, but rather less accurate from a color rendition and a tone scale standpoint.

    PE

  6. #6
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,962
    Images
    1
    so,

    "back in the day", when "prints" were made, was it like we as still photographers make prints?

    I totally understand the difference in latitude and compression rates of a neg-->pos vs pos-->pos system for reproduction.

    but in the captions, when it mentions 'prints by deluxe', what does that mean exactly? surely they didn't enlarge EVERY negative, the hundreds of thousands, if not millions for a feature 90-120 minute film. but did they, or was it an automated process, with a machine?

    thanks for all the help so far everyone

    keep ideas coming, I'm enjoying this topic a lot!

    -Dan


  7. #7
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,271
    Images
    60
    The master is a negative, and is on long roll stock which is the same size as the film that is projected at your local multiplex.

    The master is contact printed on to long roll print stock.

    This is done using an automated machine.

    Matt

  8. #8
    AgX
    AgX is online now

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,517
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    To reproduce accurate color, the capture process needs to include some method of masking to correct for unwanted color absorptions of the dyes. No positive system, to my knowledge, uses one. IDK if Technicolor did.

    But, in addition to that, Pos-Pos reproduction is a "lossy" system that compresses data in the toe and shoulder during the print process. Neg-Pos processes are not and therefore survive multiple duplications without loss.

    So, in regard to the OP, the color is not more accurate, but rather less accurate from a color rendition and a tone scale standpoint.

    PE
    PE,
    I don't understand your last point. Technicolor in its both versions (camera seperation films / camera three-layer film) is a Neg-Pos process.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,346
    Images
    84
    Good historical info about Technicolor here
    Also some fascinating stuff about early colour processes in cinematography.

  10. #10
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    PE,
    I don't understand your last point. Technicolor in its both versions (camera seperation films / camera three-layer film) is a Neg-Pos process.
    If neither were masked, then rendition would be less accurate.

    PE

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin