Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,925   Posts: 1,556,795   Online: 981
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4

    Colour negative reccomendations for dark environment

    Hi,

    I am planning ahead a trip to old fabrics factory. As I'll be chasing mainly people at work and their personal portraits I am looking for a film which would do well in dark environment. I had a thought to go straight with kodak portra 800, but as I have rather bad experiences using portra 160 in shadows then I started to wonder how good idea this actually is.

    I have some kodak bw400cn as well in case I should want to go with bw. Ilford xp2 would be another option. I have to stay with c-41 line for fast turnaround in this project.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    What format? What are the fastest lenses you have? Any possibility of fill flash?
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  3. #3
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tufts University
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,750
    Images
    5
    IIRC portra 800 is a very good film. Beware of non-daylight balanced lights because they will reap havoc.

    Why don't you test a roll to see if it suits your needs?

  4. #4
    hrst's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,300
    Images
    1
    I like Fuji Superia 1600 much. Some people say that it need to be shot at 800; well, it gives better results when overexposed a little, but I like it very much at 1600, too. Just don't try to underexpose it. I'll scan some as example in a minute...
    Last edited by hrst; 11-09-2009 at 10:43 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    OH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,789
    Images
    2
    I'd use Portra 800 or Fuji 800Z. Actually, I'd use the Portra, since it's in my fridge, but both should be nice.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    How much light, what lenses, and what format? Are they posed? Hand held? Nothing can be answered until you say those things, except perhaps some general recommendations for some fast films. These would be Pro Pro 800Z or Portra 800 for medium format, and either of these plus Superia 800 and Superia 1600 for 35mm. There is a Kodak consumer 800 film as well. Though I, and some others, think it is crap, it is also an option (35mm only).

    If 400 film will do, there are a few more options.

    As for the comment to beware of non-daylight-balanced films...it makes absolutely no sense at all. There is nothing else fast to use in the situation (except digital). Exactly what films are you warning the OP to beware of? There are none that are fast. As for non-daylight color neg films that may still be found in usable condition (NPL is gone, 100T is gone, but they are still usable), none of them were fast, so the OP would not even be considering them, let alone what is left (64T and T64), because they are slow and they are transparency films. 320T might be able to be hunted down, but it is not C-41. Additionally, you can't make the statement you made unless you know what color the lighting is. In fact, if there were such a thing as a fast tungsten-balanced neg film, that is surely what I would think of as the go-to tool for this situation, barring further details. It is "wreak", not "reap", and I am curious as to exactly what sort of "havoc" you think a non-daylight-balanced color negative film would wreak when shot in a situation about which we know almost no technical information.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #7
    hrst's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,300
    Images
    1
    Examples of Superia 1600, shot at box speed in available light, developed in Jobo processor with Fujihunt C-41 kit and scanned with Nikon Coolscan V 4000 dpi. No noise reduction, GEM, ICE or any other cheating. Adjusted some curves to match optical prints. I like 9.5x12" optical prints much. Easy to print on Supra Endura.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails qvky1.jpg   qvky2a.jpg   qvky2b.jpg   qvky3.jpg   qvky4.jpg  

    qvky6.jpg  

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4
    Thanks for the examples hrst, indeed they are quite good for 1600 considering it is a colour film.

    It is a working fabrics factory, so there should be "some" light. Half of the factory is modernized and half of it is old soviet style. So in some areas there should be plenty of light while others could be quite nitty & gritty.

    I have two 35mm bodies. Fill flash is an option. Lenses are Nikon- 50mm f1.8, 105mm f2.5 & 35mm f2.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    72
    Superia 1600 is very, very impressive if you expose it properly. It doesn't tolerate much overexposure, and underexposure produces very thin shadows - which in turn appear really grainy. There is no real 1600 speed alternative if you want a fast color negative.

    Some s1600 shots: http://hakkarainen.kuvat.fi/kuvat/20...0-01+-+Sitsit/

  10. #10
    hrst's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,300
    Images
    1
    I almost agree with Ihmemies, but in my experience Superia 1600 tolerates overexposure quite well, as most color neg films.

    I like it and it would be nice to try out some push processing to see if it has any benefit shooting in very low light (underexposing 1 stop), but the worst thing about Superia 1600 is the price. It may be the most expensive color neg film.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin