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  1. #91

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    In normal RA4 process I use Jobo processor and very low quantity of chemicals and after processing I pour developer into west because developer is very exhausted and can not develop second picture, but if I pour this developer in to bottle of fresh developer it exhausted all developer and In that quantity of developer I develop less quantity of pictures and only fresh fuji developer store good and long period of time. If you develop some quantity of pictures and store used developer for 2-5 days it works but you need another filtration and exposure time to get same result. I experimented which that and found If I print some picture write filtration on other side and try to repeat my picture after some days I need always use fresh chemicals or to do all filtration process from the beginning.

  2. #92

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    Maybe I isn't write but I think only BW image contrast is important

  3. #93
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    I have had EXACTLY the same filtration with one liter of 2 year old developer used at least in 10 sessions during those 2 years, in a tray, producing at least 50 prints of 8x10" size, probably even more! This seems to be true for both Tetenal "room temperature" developer (45 - 60 seconds) and KODAK RA-RT developer (2:00 - 2:30). Furthermore, these two produce almost identical results with same filtration. I don't know about Fuji but it should be identical enough.

    I think something is going on with that Jobo. I used to drum process Ilfochrome prints in Jobo, as it is often stated that it's the "only way" and Ilfochrome chemicals should be used one-shot (probably just one more internet legend, but oh well, due to the smell of Ilfochrome bleach, I was happy not to do it in open trays). But I wouldn't do any other process in drums. I think that drum processing is wasting time, effort and chemicals. Especially for RA-4, where you only need three trays and the chemicals are very resistant against oxidation.

  4. #94

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    And someone question. At now I use original fuji BLIX but I don't know how long it works. How many pictures I can BLIX with it ? Earlier I use my homebrew BLIX and when half of Jobo bottle going out I do 0.5 litre of blix and replenish it.
    Last edited by Sergejs Orlovskis; 05-27-2012 at 06:46 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #95

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    Maybe You write but for drum processing you need smaller space and for me personally this type of processing is more clean. for one picture I need only 80 ml of developer and after processing this quantity of developer become really bad. I try to process RA4 in trays but cleaning my bath after that is awful. But in this type of process only BW processing, stop and wash is suitable in the drum. For normal colour re-developing after pre flash minimum 1 litre of colour developer is need. maybe BLIX also can be doing in drum but it is not convenient to doing that.

  6. #96

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    What is the best solution for contrast then? Pre-flashing? Sodium sulfite in colour developer or also in BW dev?

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by boom_bass View Post
    I am almost understand how it works. My today best result Attachment 51658 at now I understand why ciba prints was so expensive You need to do very much test prints to get great result. I try to mix Your developer 1 / 3 and I think it works better. Developer Works like soft working developer and I can get soft "grey" BW neg. For normal BW process this kind of neg is awful because very hard to get normal BW print but for this process it works great. Tomorrow I try mix developer 1/4 and I do many Re-exposure test and I think then longer Re-ex time than better and colourful print You can get but I not shore yet I check it tomorrow.
    That's not why Ciba prints were expensive. They were expensive because the materials were expensive, almost ridiculously so during the last few years. In fact when I printed both Ilfochrome and RA4 I needed fewer test prints and wasted less (but much more expensive) material with Ilfochrome. You are experimenting with a process that isn't exactly optimized and has a lot more variables than Ilfochrome, and isn't (probably, and this seems particularly so for portraits) going to look as good even if done perfectly. Ilfochrome was easy because you had the original transparency as a reference, and the filtration didn't seem to change much among the same film types - once you had it for Kodachrome, or most Ektachrome, or Provia or whatever, you were pretty much there for that film type printed on that emulsion batch of paper. Oh bad exposure or odd lighting could change it, but corrections were more intuitive too. And when you started a new emulsion batch of paper you could compare the starting pack printed on it, see how it varied from the last one, and get pretty darned close on the first print. A couple of 4x5 or so test prints and you'd be good on the new one.

    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    I have had EXACTLY the same filtration with one liter of 2 year old developer used at least in 10 sessions during those 2 years, in a tray, producing at least 50 prints of 8x10" size, probably even more! This seems to be true for both Tetenal "room temperature" developer (45 - 60 seconds) and KODAK RA-RT developer (2:00 - 2:30). Furthermore, these two produce almost identical results with same filtration. I don't know about Fuji but it should be identical enough.

    I think something is going on with that Jobo. I used to drum process Ilfochrome prints in Jobo, as it is often stated that it's the "only way" and Ilfochrome chemicals should be used one-shot (probably just one more internet legend, but oh well, due to the smell of Ilfochrome bleach, I was happy not to do it in open trays). But I wouldn't do any other process in drums. I think that drum processing is wasting time, effort and chemicals. Especially for RA-4, where you only need three trays and the chemicals are very resistant against oxidation.

    How are you maintaining temperature control for RA4 in trays? A water bath and...aquarium heater maybe? I'd jump back into RA4 except that I haven't exactly puzzled out how to best maintain temperature in trays, the few Nova slot processors that have come up on eBay go for absurd prices (save one I just plain missed out on ) and I hate the wash/dry the drum cycle with drum printing, especially since I don't currently have running water in my darkroom. A big 7 gallon container of water with a faucet on it and a holding bath are workable if annoying for black and white - not so much for color if every time I wash a print drums requires a run up and down the stairs to the bathroom.

  8. #98
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    Reversal print materials are built to a contrast of about 1.0 but negative print materials have a contrast of about 2.5 and thus you have a severe contrast problem if you cross process negative materials. Add to that the fact that the process is not optimum in any case for cross processing and you have some severe chances of high Dmin, mottle, and crossover. I was never able to fix all of these in one simple process, but I was able to minimize them all. I stuck to landscapes and nature photos and things went just fine. If I went to portraits the results varied from quite bad to just barely acceptable.

    I had several people send me sample landscape prints that were excellent and I have one large print of my own on the wall here. So, if you stick to suitable subjects you can get very good results, otherwise I suggest that you avoid this cross process.

    See examples on Photo Net posted by a variety of people including Bujor B. He has also used Endura in-camera to get some excellent positive images using this process. He had to use a lot of filtration IIRC.

    PE

  9. #99
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    How are you maintaining temperature control for RA4 in trays?
    This is an easy one - I just don't maintain it!

    It has never been colder than 21-22 deg C in the darkroom I use, but naturally, in the summer, the temperature has been up from this point. I have never noticed any differences in prints. Maybe you should avoid temperatures below 20 deg C and maybe you can shorten the development time when it's hot. Anyway, the temperature seems to have minimal effect in color balance (filtration), which is a bit surprising.

  10. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    This is an easy one - I just don't maintain it!

    It has never been colder than 21-22 deg C in the darkroom I use, but naturally, in the summer, the temperature has been up from this point. I have never noticed any differences in prints. Maybe you should avoid temperatures below 20 deg C and maybe you can shorten the development time when it's hot. Anyway, the temperature seems to have minimal effect in color balance (filtration), which is a bit surprising.
    That's interesting. I know you can use Kodak RA4 developer without the starter at room temperature, but also read some difference of opinion here with some saying Kodak paper worked well with this and Fuji not as well - I believe you have good results with Fuji CA? More important is the question of consistency. Do you vary the development time with temperature?

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