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  1. #21

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    I use Mitsubishi paper from Photo Warehouse, it hasn't any back printing. Of course Kodak and Fuji do. This is an interneg procedure but with a paper negative, so I don't have to fool with C41, and therefore I have a quick process. I balance the filtration for the paper first with a standard negative. Then place some leader from a C41 negative and a diffuser in the light path. I flash the paper, then remove the diffuser and leader and put the slide in the carrier, and expose the paper. I've used full strength developer and developer diluted 1:1. Then after blixing, washing, drying I have the internegative. Contact print it, and process it. I'm still experimenting, but I've had some results that were just as promising as the process using the b&w developer. In fact, I've had some very good results. As I said though, I'm still experimenting. Hoping either I or someone else will make something work well.

  2. #22
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Not to go off from the threads topica but how do you like the Mitsubishi paper for regular printing?
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  3. #23

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    I'm very satisfied with it. I may be very mistaken, but I think I read somewhere it is or was the most used paper for the 1 hour labs. That of course only says it was one of the most competitively priced papers. I have Kodak, Fuji, and Photo Warehouse paper on hand. When I want to print something important, I usually use Kodak. Sometimes Fuji. For everything else, such as snapshots, proofs, etc. I use the Photo Warehouse paper as it is easier on my budget. I might add, all three papers have slightly different looks. I think the Mitsubishi paper fits between the look of the Kodak and the Fuji, and therefore is good for a lot of subjects.

  4. #24
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    Mitsubishi = Konishiroku = Sakura.

    PE

  5. #25

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    After balancing the paper, you can dial in an extra 60 yellow and 40 magenta instead of placing a strip of C41 leader in the path. I've tried to find my notes, but its been several months since I last printed any color or experimented with the RA4 interneg. I committed to a couple of print exchanges and a negative exchange and so I've put all my time into those for now. After reading the recent post to this thread though, I want to go back and try the RA4 reversal again.

  6. #26

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    An RA4 interneg and the RA4 contact print from it. (5x7) scanned with an epson V500 without any corrections.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails RA4interneg.jpg   RA4frominterneg.jpg  

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Mitsubishi = Konishiroku = Sakura.

    PE
    ???

    Konishiroku = Sakura

    Mitsubishi = Mitsubishi

    ???

    Of course, I might wrong... Perhaps I be seeing the world through cherry colored glasses... Can you explain you understanding of the relationship that led you to the above equation?

  8. #28
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    Mitsubishi bank owned Sakura (Konishiroku) and also the Mitsubishi plant and therefore the Hachioji plant of Konishiroku Kabushiki Kaisha and the Mitsubishi photographic paper plant were closely allied and in close communication. This is directly from Wakabayashi Yasuo Hakase San, Fukushacho of R&D at Konica. Wakarimashita?

    Confirmed by Ueda Hirozo Hakase San, Fukushacho of Fuj during lunch and a tour at Kodak Parki.

    All personal communications!

    Sayonara, to mato ato de.

    PE

  9. #29
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    Ignoring reversal for a moment, is there any reason other than convenience to use an RA-4 interneg instead of C-41? Seems to me the C-41 would be (much) cheaper, at least for 135 and probably for MF if printing large, plus it means you can enlarge to any size. Or am I missing something?

  10. #30

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    A correction. I'm posting this all without my notes, which may not even exist anymore. It should be obvious that you can't project through an orange mask and get an orange mask on the RA4 interneg. So, you have to project through the opposite. The mask should consist of 60 cyan and 20 magenta. This will then give an orange mask on the interneg. I think that is right. I'll continue to look for my notes.

    polyglot: Yes, if you didn't have the positive to positive chemicals and papers, and didn't want a print made using digital, the likely best way to go would be to make a C41 internegative. But to do so, you have to copy the transparency onto the film, process the film, and then enlarge the film. I was looking for a way to quickly do a positive to positive and remain in the RA4 workflow. And after all that I've done, the C41 route is the only way to go if you need quality.

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