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  1. #11
    dwdmguy's Avatar
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    MSC, these are very outdated however can still be used in a relative source I think... Don't really know. Someone here will help for sure. I can tell you that if I wait until I have at least six rolls I save quite a bit. I have a single tank as well that gives me 2 135's or 1-220 or 2-120's with the duo tabs. The longer you can wait the better I guess....

  2. #12

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    shameless bump

  3. #13
    Denis P.'s Avatar
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    I'm not exactly an expert (I've started doing E6 less than a month ago, and have done exactly 4 rounds so far ) - but I'll try to help with what I know.

    Quote Originally Posted by msc20 View Post

    1) Starting out, my e-6 processing level will be low, 20 rolls maybe once or twice a month. So I assume the 2300 is the more sensible one to set up first? Or maybe it does not matter?
    Can't say exactly, don't know about those two models - I use Jobo CPA2,a manual machine

    Use whatever is easier and quicker to set up...

    2) I plan to process 35mm, 120/220 e-6. What drums should I purchase for these formats?
    How many rolls at a time? One by one? Three-four 120 films at a time?
    The drum size depends on that. I'm not sure I get your "20 rolls once or twice a month". At once? There's no drum big enough for 20 rolls at once - and even if it were, such drum would be too heavy for the Jobo lift, I think.

    Don't buy the biggest you can, thinking it might come handy. The bigger ones use more chemistry, and are not very practical for 1-2 films.
    Attched is a one-page PDF with the list of Jobo drums. See for yourself which one would suit you best.


    3) I assume its best to have a small hot water heater near the processor for best temperature control. Any recommendations on which one to buy? The feed water is Reverse Osmosis, so glass lined would be ideal.... I would think..
    I don't have any experience with the kind of processors you have - like I said, I use CPA2, and I have to use a separate plastic bucket for keeping the rinse water heated properly.

    4) OK for all e-6 used chemicals to go straight down the city drain?
    Hmmmmm.... not exactly, I think. If you have some kind of local waste treatment facility, I think it would be preferable to just dumping everything down the drain...

    5) Is silver recover recommended, or is this only for very high volume processing? Any inline systems you can suggest?
    High volume only, I'd say. The volumes you mention are not really "high" enough for that.

    6) I will be processing Fuji Films, is there any advantage to using fuji chemicals? I assume they are identical to Kodaks?
    More or less. I use Fuji chemicals, but only because I couldn't find Kodak ones locally. Regarding the Fuji/Kodak FILMS difference, the general wisdom is that Fuji films require about 15 seconds more in the first developer: i.e. if the normal time is 6:30, then for Fuji films 6:45 should be used. I've followed that "general wisdom", and got OK results.

    7) In another thread, "Kompressor" mentioned some Kodak chemical he purchased contains an excellent instruction booklet on the details of e-6 processing. Is this booklet available in pdf format anywhere? Or, if there is other "must read" e-6 processing information, please advise..
    The stuff I've read BEFORE I tried anything:

    1) Fujifilm Technical Info Sheet: 3E6 Processing Kit (PDF)
    2) Fujifilm Technical Bulletin: Process PRO6 (PDF)
    3) JOBO_E-6_Handbuch_GB (the one I linked in my previous post)
    4) Kodak E6process pub. #J83 (PDF)
    5) Kodak pub. Z99 and Z119 (PDF)

    There's more, I'm sure... But those should keep you busy.
    Attached Files

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    Thanks Denis, I see what ya mean by the volume of 35mm.... looks like I will need a few of the 35mm drums, for both high capacity runs (12 per drum) and low capacity, such as the 2 rolls of the 2523/21. I assume your point is, if your drums are too high capacity, you waste a lot of chemicals, cause the chemical fill is a function of drum size, not amount of film in the drum, correct?

  5. #15
    Denis P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msc20 View Post
    I assume your point is, if your drums are too high capacity, you waste a lot of chemicals, cause the chemical fill is a function of drum size, not amount of film in the drum, correct?
    Yes - you have to waste more chemicals than actually required, PLUS you need to handle those unwieldy big drums, PLUS you're putting extra strain on the Jobo lift (your processor does have a lift, doesn't it?)

    In short: when I have only two films to do, I use the smallest tank available/adequate.
    When I have many films at once, I use the appropriate one.

    Last weekend I had to develop 24 sheets of 4x5 Velvia. I had to do it in two runs, because:

    1) my largest drum is Jobo 2840 (which is actually a PRINT drum, BTW), and
    2) I only have 3 reels for 4x5 - one new 2509N, and two older 2509 (without "N" designation). Therefore, the max. number of sheets I can do is 14 (6 in the new reel, and 4 each in the older reels).

  6. #16

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    Thanks Denis... I read that some of the jobo reel drums (35mm and 120/220) are much harder to load than some of the other ones... plus, metal vs. plastic?

  7. #17
    Denis P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msc20 View Post
    Thanks Denis... I read that some of the jobo reel drums (35mm and 120/220) are much harder to load than some of the other ones... plus, metal vs. plastic?
    Can't help you there - I've never used metal reels. Apart from Jobo, I've used Paterson ones (self-loading, those with the small steel ball), which are good.
    I don'h have any problems loading: I got used to those Jobo plastic ones, I guess

    With 120 format it helps to snip off the corners of the film before loading it. The reels should be perfectly dry before loading - otherwise it could be very difficult. If you're doing E6, you should not use the final rinse while the film is on the reel: remove the film and put it in a separate tray containing the final rinse. If you do use final rinse (detergent-like, foams a lot) with film on the reel, you should wash the reel very thoroughly afterwards. Same goes for Photo-flo for B/W films. It makes the reels rather sticky if you don't wash them very carefully afterwards, using hot water and an old toothbrush or something.

  8. #18
    Dave Pritchard's Avatar
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    The laws about disposal of used chemicals are generally local to your city or town. Where I live, it is legal to put most photo chemicals down the drain, for residential customers. Commercial processors have other requirements.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by guyjr View Post
    The thing that takes the most amount of time I'm finding is mixing up all of the chemicals... since everything is one-shot, I can't reuse between batches, so I'm trying to load two 120 rolls onto the reel at a time - that has gone a bit easier than I was expecting actually. I use the Kodak recommended amount of solution (250mL per sq ft of film) to determine the amount for this combo, which is 312.5mL (90 sq in per 120 roll x 2).
    I was adviced to run two rolls of 120 in 250mL .. But my slides turn up on the dark side (i run them at 7:15). Maybe 320mL will remedy that?

  10. #20
    hrst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrydberg View Post
    I was adviced to run two rolls of 120 in 250mL .. But my slides turn up on the dark side (i run them at 7:15). Maybe 320mL will remedy that?
    Kodak Single-Use kit's instruction says to use 260mL for two 135-36 rolls, if I remember correctly. So I would suggest a temperature-related problem (or exposure!) instead of too low chemical activity due to low volume. It's true that 120 roll has a bit higher surface area than a 135-36 roll, but I believe that KODAK's figure has also some safety zone in it. This is because they can't know about the exposure, which has a large influence in the chemical exhaustion. I would guess that the effects of too low solution volume start appearing visually if you have a roll of very bright, overexposed shots.

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