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  1. #31

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    What about the paper?

    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    So, there is no "exposure latitude" for a given film, but rather there is "exposure latitude" for a given film AND scene.
    So, the colour-negative film may have a long dynamic range, but what about the photographic paper the negative is printed on?

    I have heard it said that the dynamic range of the photographic paper is substantially less than that of the film (only 1/2 or 1/3rd that of the film: i.e. onnly about 5 stops).

    Hence, even if the detail is present in the negative, it won't translate to (or show on) the actual print

    (Although, as markbarendt points out, you can selectivley print segments of the range)

    BTW: Thanks for the interesting illustration (the "overexposed" frame).

    When viewing colour prints, its amazing how much more detail one can see and how much more "zing" the print has, if viewed in bright light, especially in full sunlight.
    Last edited by Galah; 12-06-2009 at 07:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #32
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    By dodging and burning, a very large portion of the negative scale can be used. And, as I said before, prints on print film can utilize the entire scale. Under very bright lighting though, you can see the hidden portions of the tone scale in the dmax of a print.

    PE

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galah View Post
    Hence, even if the detail is present in the negative, it won't translate to (or show on) the actual print

    (Although, as markbarendt points out, you can selectivley print segments of the range)
    Galah,

    I apologize, my words seem to have led you astray. :o

    You most certainly can print the entire range. If the film happens to catch 20 stops of the scenes brightness with detail then you can print all 20.

    By selective I mean that you can select all or part of that entire range, whatever suits your needs.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Galah,
    You most certainly can print the entire range. If the film happens to catch 20 stops of the scenes brightness with detail then you can print all 20.
    .
    OK, thanks

  5. #35

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    So I took 5 4x5" shots for test shots where I wrote down very detailed info to check exposures before I go on vacation. The "pro" lab that I sent it to was nice enough to cross process it for me so now I have no idea about how the exposures turned out and no time to do another batch

  6. #36
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    Uhggerrahhh *&^*&*(%%$**(%$$##

    I feel your pain.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #37
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    Let me rephrase this thread's question in a slightly different way.

    I've always shot slides, but have recently bought a variety of neg film for my 6x6; NPS160 and Portra, with Ektar100 coming soon.
    I'll be using a spot meter and exposure compensation to place critical shadows at a particular exposure value.

    From what I've read, I understand that neg film has quite a bit more linear highlight headroom, up to 5+ (!) stops, compared to 2 or 3 stops of shadow latitude. Correct?

    Can someone offer ballpark specifics: Using film, X, how deep are the detailed shadows, -2, 2.5, maybe -3 stops?
    And just how far do those highlights hang in there? I'll certainly shoot some test images, but would appreciate a starting point.

    Also, how much of this latitude is 'extractable' by a typical dedicated film scanner? (Nikon 8/9K, etc.)

    Thanks.

    Greg
    Last edited by Greg Campbell; 12-19-2009 at 03:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #38

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    Color negative film behaves a lot like black and white negative film. There are differences between films, of course, but a ballpark for dynamic range would be +/-4 zones (stops), with maybe a bit more on the highlight side. You probably will get some texture but not any detail in zone I, and rather little detail in zone II. Shadows can safely be placed high in zone III with good detail. Zone IX may retain some detail; zone X may even show a little.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Campbell View Post
    ...From what I've read, I understand that neg film has quite a bit more linear highlight headroom, up to 5+ (!) stops, compared to 2 or 3 stops of shadow latitude. Correct?
    This depends on where you place your shadows. With C-41 I find it tough to burn out any highlights that matter. See next point.

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Campbell View Post
    ...Can someone offer ballpark specifics: Using film, X, how deep are the detailed shadows, -2, 2.5, maybe -3 stops?
    The best way to get a feel for this is to shoot a test roll.

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Campbell View Post
    Also, how much of this latitude is 'extractable' by a typical dedicated film scanner? (Nikon 8/9K, etc.)
    Scanning questions are off topic here at APUG but http://www.hybridphoto.com/forums/home.php can help.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    Color negative film behaves a lot like black and white negative film. There are differences between films, of course, but a ballpark for dynamic range would be +/-4 zones (stops), with maybe a bit more on the highlight side. You probably will get some texture but not any detail in zone I, and rather little detail in zone II. Shadows can safely be placed high in zone III with good detail. Zone IX may retain some detail; zone X may even show a little.
    Thank you! I'm off to shoot the new film tomorrow - this will give me a good idea of what to expect and how to proceed.

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