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  1. #1

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    Old, old Velvia and reciprocity?

    I received some old Velvia (120) with a camera outfit I bought recently and had a couple questions.

    Obviously, this is the old Velvia (it expired in September, 2000). I was wondering if I should be exposing it any differently, and if so, how? I was also trying to find out what the reciprocity characteristics of the old Velvia are, I've only been able to find info on the new kind.

    I can't tell you how the film has been kept,but I doubt it has been refrigerated the whole time...

  2. #2
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Velvia is a professional emulsion released to the market very close to its optimum palette and refrigeration (below 15°c) for short term and freezing for long term storage is the prior-use standard. Any film that has been lying around unused, exposed to varying tempertures and climate extremes over a long period of time (and 2000 is a long time ago) will exhibit gross loss of film speed and contrast, colour shifts and casting (in Velvia 50, this is green but can also manifest as purplish). The rolls you have might be good for an experiment or two to prove Velvia's tolerance over time to degradation.

    Presumably you are referring to Velvia (known as nothing else), prior to Fujifilm's tweaking of the emulsion and renaming it to Velvia 50? The former went out a long time ago so getting a data sheet could prove challenging. You could use the Velvia 50 data sheet as a start to experiment (rather than commit serious work to). Other than that, I'd toss it.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

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  3. #3
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    just as a let-you-know,

    I shot a roll of Velvia(original, like, pre-Velvia 50 re-naming) I think it was something like 2000 or 2001 out of date, but I shot it anyhow. Very nasty magenta cast to it, even the unexposed rebate(black) area around the frames had a cloudy appearance. There was an image there, but not very nice

    -Dan


  4. #4

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    Interesting info. And yes, the film I'm referring to is "Velvia", not the newer Velvia 50 which according to what I've read, has "improved" reciprocity characteristics (not sure what the improvements are though exactly...)

    I shot one roll of it so far using my Holga, just for fun and to see if the film was still any good. I expected most of the shots to come out underexposed, considering the shutter speed is around 1/100th and the aperture is around f/8, which seems like a pretty short exposure in most lighting conditions for a 50 ISO film. When I picked up the chromes, I was surprised to see that pretty much all the frames came out, underexposed, but still not too terrible. I made a couple nighttime bulb exposures just guessing at the shutter speed (around 1 minute) that actually came out pretty nice. I was even further surprised that there didn't appear to be any significant color shifts, considering the age of the film and the fact it was shot with a toy camera. I also didn't have that problem with the unexposed area around the frames coming out cloudy, they were black like they should be.

    These will be fun rolls to just play around with, but being that processing isn't really cheap, I just wanted to make as many good exposures as possible. So from the info so far, it sounds like I should be overexposing the film a decent amount though, correct?

  5. #5
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Well, I'd try a test roll in E-6 first, in a camera with which you can set an exposure, not the Holga. If it is too ugly, you can assign the rest of it to C-41 use. Toss it if it is not perfect? Oh, please.....:rolleyes: You can certainly do something with it. It is not even ten years past date. Give it to someone else if you don't want it, but don't toss it.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 12-04-2009 at 09:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  6. #6
    hrst's Avatar
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    Examples of 35mm Velvia expired in about 2000 and stored mostly at room temperature, I shot this summer:

    http://sorsa-tv.ath.cx/~antalh/acon_...anha_velvia50/ (RUUTU30.jpg shows color correction after scanning in Photoshop, but others are not so post-processed).

    Shows quite red-magenta dmax and a high red-magenta cast, but can be quite interesting when shot in fluorescent light -- compensating the green cast. But not unusable at all, if this effect is desired. I shot the roll at 50 and it doesn't show any visible speed loss (well maybe in the green layer).
    Last edited by hrst; 12-04-2009 at 09:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7

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    I've been shooting Velvia 50 from 1995 that has always been frozen and was purchased on ebay. No issues whatsoever. The catch is it must be frozen in order to keep well.

  8. #8

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    Makes sense. I guess I must have gotten lucky cause I'm guessing this film was frozen for at least some part of its lifetime!

  9. #9
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    2000 ain't old. The polaroid 100D from 1991 I've been shooting is old. If it was frozen, there shouldn't be any issues you can't correct in printing. As far as reciprocity goes the times are the same. No improvements were made with velvia 50 that I'm aware of. You should be able to find a chart online quite easily. I pretty much shoot expired film exclusively and I wouldn't treat the film any differently. I also haven't won any awards.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix



 

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