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  1. #11

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    Thanks for the replies guys. Reading the responses has got me interested in doing something like this. Hopefully I'll get around to it soon



    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post

    Occasionally I've displayed 8x10" transparencies temporarily using a thin Logan light pad, which is designed for such use.
    David, if i'm reading this right, you displayed the actual transparencies you shot in your camera? Would it be possible to permanently display a large format slide using a lightbox?
    "I have captured the light and arrested its flight! The sun itself shall draw my pictures!"

    -Louis Daguerre, 1839-

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Re: How to display large format slides

    Yes, I've displayed original transparencies that way. I'd have some concern about fading with long term display of an original color transparency. Maybe a solution to that would be UV absorbent glass on both sides of the transparency.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Yes, I've displayed original transparencies that way. I'd have some concern about fading with long term display of an original color transparency. Maybe a solution to that would be UV absorbent glass on both sides of the transparency.

    I didnt think about fading. If I contact printed a large format black and white negative on to a black and white and created a black and white positive, would that possibly work "better" than a color transparency? By "Better," I mean would black and white film deteriorate faster than a color transparancy, assuming they're both processed properly?

    The HP5+ I've shot in 35mm has a slight bluish purple tint to it. I'm assuming it would have the same color in 8x10 as well (correct me if i'm wrong). If so, that's the only drawback I can think of with the exception of possible fading/deteriorating. Maybe if I could use that as a creative effect...

    My imagination is going wild today
    "I have captured the light and arrested its flight! The sun itself shall draw my pictures!"

    -Louis Daguerre, 1839-

  4. #14
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    More fixing and washing will generally get rid of the tint from your negs. But if you print to HP5, you're going to have to develop it pretty hard to get enough contrast. And the base won't be as clear as a dedicated printing material.

    B&W film (and paper) should not fade from light, but oxygen and sulfides will attack the silver. If laminated or bathed in Sistan, it should last on display for decades. You can tone as well but that has colour effects you may find undesirable.

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