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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by jp80874 View Post
    Jobo does not appear to be selling the film processors in the USA any more. B&H Photo carries seven pages of Jobo accessories, even pieces parts for the film processors, but no film processors such as CPP-2 mentioned in the OP. I did not see that the OP said where he is located, but he has a benefactor with a used CPP-2.

    John Powers
    Well Jobo International has the CPE2+ Processor on their website and Fotoimpex berlin has the CPP2 listed in their 2009 catalogue.
    best regards
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    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

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  2. #32

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    Do you have to have a bucket under the unit and dump water periodicaly during the cycle?

    I also don't have a sturdy table for it; I have one of those folding tables with white plastic tabletop and metal legs.

    I may reconsider though, if it will save me money when it comes to E6 developing. I currently pay about $5-6 per roll to have E6 developed, and this is getting hard to afford. I don't mind saving up, say a dozen or 15 rolls and processing them at one time.

    I'm so "green" when it comes to this color processing stuff, that I don't know how feasible it is. About all I know is that you want to avoid bleach-fix solutions and go for a separate bleach and fix. With a Jobo and E6 chemicals that have separate bleach and fix, am I likely to be able to get under $5 per roll? If so, I will definitely reconsider, as paying increasing prices for processing is hard. Once Kodachrome is gone, I want to go back to E6.
    Last edited by B&Wpositive; 12-23-2009 at 12:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #33
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    Originally Posted by jp80874
    Jobo does not appear to be selling the film processors in the USA any more. B&H Photo carries seven pages of Jobo accessories, even pieces parts for the film processors, but no film processors such as CPP-2 mentioned in the OP. I did not see that the OP said where he is located, but he has a benefactor with a used CPP-2.

    John Powers

    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren View Post
    Well Jobo International has the CPE2+ Processor on their website and Fotoimpex berlin has the CPP2 listed in their 2009 catalogue.
    best regards
    Clearly the USA is a small market and Jobo has made their belief of that clear.
    I will continue to scavenge parts and units and hope they outlast my need Jobo.

    John

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Wpositive View Post
    Do you have to have a bucket under the unit and dump water periodicaly during the cycle?

    I also don't have a sturdy table for it; I have one of those folding tables with white plastic tabletop and metal legs.

    I may reconsider though, if it will save me money when it comes to E6 developing. I currently pay about $5-6 per roll to have E6 developed, and this is getting hard to afford. I don't mind saving up, say a dozen or 15 rolls and processing them at one time.

    I'm so "green" when it comes to this color processing stuff, that I don't know how feasible it is. About all I know is that you want to avoid bleach-fix solutions and go for a separate bleach and fix. With a Jobo and E6 chemicals that have separate bleach and fix, am I likely to be able to get under $5 per roll? If so, I will definitely reconsider, as paying increasing prices for processing is hard. Once Kodachrome is gone, I want to go back to E6.
    I use some 5L plastic Cans/bottles in which we buy sprinkler fluids for our cars here in DK. I use a lift on my Jobo so the placement is obviously beneath the hose.
    Best regards
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    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

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  5. #35

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    I think a lot of people (myself included) would disagree regarding Jobos not being good for B&W. You do need to work out your own developing times, as rotary processing does affect development, but once you've got your testing done, it's brilliant, you can process with confidence, knowing that if you control your variables you will get consistent results every time. I haven't done colour yet, only 4x5 sheets of B&W and love my CPA (basically same as a CPP just a model below). The water bath helps keep the temperature just right, and it takes a lot of the guess work out of processing. If you need a hand let me know and I'll happily run through how I use my machine for B&W. BTW I'm also using it in a shed, with no sink or running water. It's on a bench, I just fill the water bath with a hose when needed and empty chems into a bucket. Works fine, it's one of the great things about the Jobos, it's a really good option if you don't have a darkroom and only want to do film.

  6. #36

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    Thanks! Sounds mostly good.

    I'm definitely starting to seriously rethink my decision and have told the person who has the unit.

    Question about emptying: Do all the chemicals and the water mix toegther when you empty it, or is it possible to keep them separate? I simply don't want to have umpteen gallons of mixed liquid from a single use of the Jobo that all has to be saved and then brought to a haz-waste center! Please tell me it was not designed in such a way so everything just mixes together when you drain it.

    I would also use it for E-6 and possibly C-41 if the prices of chemicals are such that the per roll cost is affordable (eg under $5 per roll for E6 or under $2 per roll for C-41).

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Wpositive View Post
    Ok, so someone has a Jobo CPP2 available and I'm trying to decide if it's practical for me or not. here is my situation:

    I currently develop 35mm and medium format b&w film. I am going to be setting up an enlarger in the basement soon to start printing. I do not have running water in the basement.

    I am planning to do some b&w printing and maybe film developing, too, for my colleague's wedding photography business, though I don't know if our experiement will end up panning out.

    I don't currently do color, though I kind of want to do RA-4 too, or possibly C-41 if I can afford the chemicals and if it's practical for a non-professional printer who has no dedicated darkroom, running water, or ventilation in the basement.

    I don't know if the Jobo thing is practical for someone like me...does it need running water nearby? Can you use it on the concrete floor without making a mess? How big and heavy is it? Do you have to be good with troubleshooting mechanisms? Will the Jobo make color easier or is it just a big pain? Can you use it for both color and b&w? Does it need 220 volts? Do you have to use it in the dark? How much current does it draw? etc, etc. Please educate me so I can decide whether it fits my needs or not. Thanks.
    Reading through this thread and the great responses you have been given by folks here it seems as though you have lot of "how to" questions with regard to setting up a good, working darkroom even without the CPP2. You also mentioned that you will be developing films for a wedding business. IF you are going to do this, you will definately need a good workflow in your basement and that means setting up a good wet side and a dry side in a darkroom. In any event, get things off the floor so you can work. Be creative in utilizing the space you have.

    I process C-41 and B\W with my CPP2 in my garage; a 6x3 foot area on a shelf. No running water, space heater in winter, no air in summer. I run a hose from the house when needed. The increase in productivity is the payoff.

    You ran across a free working CPP2. Take it. If it doesnt suit you, you can always off-load it.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Wpositive View Post
    ....
    Question about emptying: Do all the chemicals and the water mix toegther when you empty it, or is it possible to keep them separate? I simply don't want to have umpteen gallons of mixed liquid from a single use of the Jobo that all has to be saved and then brought to a haz-waste center! Please tell me it was not designed in such a way so everything just mixes together when you drain it....
    ).
    In the nineth post long time Jobo user Oren Grad answered your question about locating a manual.

    Originally Posted by B&Wpositive
    Is there an instruction manual online somewhere?

    http://www.jobo.com/jobo_service_ana...2_cpp-2_00.htm

    If you will take a little time to look at the manual you will not have to ask questions such as this.

    John Powers

  9. #39

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    Good advice. I will read the manual.

    Thank you to the person who linked to it.

  10. #40

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    For most of your work, you wll probably continue to use your current methods. But the Jobo is an excellent choice for you even so. First, it makes color much easier, and you want to move in that direction eventually. Second, it makes big prints much easier. Third, it makes processing multiple rolls of film easy. Fourth, it you go to large format, it has the best tanks for large format film processing that you can get.

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