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  1. #1

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    To Jobo or not to Jobo

    Ok, so someone has a Jobo CPP2 available and I'm trying to decide if it's practical for me or not. here is my situation:

    I currently develop 35mm and medium format b&w film. I am going to be setting up an enlarger in the basement soon to start printing. I do not have running water in the basement.

    I am planning to do some b&w printing and maybe film developing, too, for my colleague's wedding photography business, though I don't know if our experiement will end up panning out.

    I don't currently do color, though I kind of want to do RA-4 too, or possibly C-41 if I can afford the chemicals and if it's practical for a non-professional printer who has no dedicated darkroom, running water, or ventilation in the basement.

    I don't know if the Jobo thing is practical for someone like me...does it need running water nearby? Can you use it on the concrete floor without making a mess? How big and heavy is it? Do you have to be good with troubleshooting mechanisms? Will the Jobo make color easier or is it just a big pain? Can you use it for both color and b&w? Does it need 220 volts? Do you have to use it in the dark? How much current does it draw? etc, etc. Please educate me so I can decide whether it fits my needs or not. Thanks.
    Last edited by B&Wpositive; 12-19-2009 at 04:57 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    GrantR's Avatar
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    The CPP2 is still a pretty basic machine--it's rather large (about 2.5-3ft wide). I use mine with running water nearby, but it is by no means necessary, I just like having a place to dump all the water afterwards--the machine itself is fairly light, but when it is full of water, it is fairly heavy, I imagine about 50-60lbs. I would advise keeping it on a bench/worktable about waist height. I rarely use it though for black and white as it seems to give about a 1/3 stop push. The JOBO is about the only way to do color without it being a huge pain in the butt (with the exception of having a minilab in your basement). The CPP also just takes a regular 110 outlet. If you're getting this thing for free, I say go for it.

  3. #3

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    Good insight; thank you very much.

    Anyone else with further insight? I'd like as many inputs as possible.

  4. #4
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    He summed it up well. A Jobo is a good fit for your needs. It works great for roll film development.

    The machine might be free, but assembling the right tanks and reels could be pricey if not included.

    Don't try to lift the unit when it is full of water. You could drain it into a bucket before moving it.

    If you intend to do color it is great for temperature control for both film and paper. Makes it easy.
    Jerold Harter MD

  5. #5

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    Personally I only use my Jobo for E-6 and C-41 (and once in a great while, for RA-4), but never for B&W. The only way I can imagine using it for B&W is if I needed to develop more than four rolls at once, but I just don't shoot enough at a time to get there.

  6. #6

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    i have used one for e6 process - filling from a bucket is no problem so running water not required i had mine on a bench at waist height working on a concrete floor would be a PIA as you will be bending over for every change of chemicals also i had a medium size plastic tank that i pour the used chems into after each cycle - the electrics are 12v auto wiper motor to turn the drum 110/240 (depending where you are 110 for USA 240V for Europe and Australia) for the heater element should not be to expensive to run if you plan to do c41 it would be just the ticket

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    Don't try to lift the unit when it is full of water. You could drain it into a bucket before moving it.
    Draining the water, ok...as long as it doesn't make a mess by splashing. Is there a tube or anything to drain it into a bucket? And how do you drain the chemicals? How much fluid do you have to put in? And how many containers for fluid are there?

    Is there an instruction manual online somewhere?

  8. #8

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    As far as working on the floor...if it were necessary, how big a deal would it be? Would it just require kneeling to pour in water and chemical? Could the unit be drained from the floor without water leaking out all over and flooding everything? Or do you need gravity to drain it properly?

    We have one of those plastic folding tables from Costco (with metal legs). Not sure if it could support the Jobo filled up.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Wpositive View Post
    Is there an instruction manual online somewhere?
    http://www.jobo.com/jobo_service_ana...2_cpp-2_00.htm

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Wpositive View Post
    As far as working on the floor...if it were necessary, how big a deal would it be? Would it just require kneeling to pour in water and chemical? Could the unit be drained from the floor without water leaking out all over and flooding everything? Or do you need gravity to drain it properly?
    It depends how much you care about your knees and your back. You'll be bouncing up and down with every step in the process, and color tends to have very short process steps. Draining the tempering bath with the unit sitting on the floor would be a nuisance - the spigot is on one end of the "tub", at the bottom.

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