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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3Dfan View Post
    I would want it to look at the negative.
    When I first started printing I wondered if this could help me. But I struggled to work out exactly how I could interpret a scan in a way that could be translated into filter pack values. In practice, though, I found my eye was the best gauge I could hope for and very soon I was able to spot the error in the print and have an idea of the remedy before I even used my Kodak viewing filters.

  2. #22

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    Far better than a color analizer is a print viewing station and a set of viewing filters. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...er_PDV_1E.html The station will set you back a couple of dollars but will prove to be well worth the expenditure.

  3. #23
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    You could try that but it would involve making multiple test prints with multiple different films to calibrate it...which seems like you're doing work for work.

    I purchased a daylight balanced fluorescent light bulb online for viewing. Also, if you display in galleries lit by tungsten lights you would want to balance for tungsten.
    --Nicholas Andre

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    You could try that but it would involve making multiple test prints with multiple different films to calibrate it...which seems like you're doing work for work.

    I purchased a daylight balanced fluorescent light bulb online for viewing. Also, if you display in galleries lit by tungsten lights you would want to balance for tungsten.
    I haven't seen the need to calibrate the station. Instead it is the station that is used to identify a color cast on the print and, if one exists, then a quick flick of a viewing filter will indicate the filtration to remove that cast. Once a cast is removed will it reappear under tungsten?

    Except for the brightness range of various lighting sources making it easier or harder to see a print, I haven't noticed any difference is prints balanced by a balanced fluorescent bulb regardless of where it was hung.

  5. #25

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    It's been awhile since I did RA4 but with Fuji paper it was noticeable that as little as 2 units of red on a Dichro head made a considerable difference to the cast. I have never used filters but if 5CC is the equivalent of more than 2 units on a Dichro head then you might have difficulty getting to a neutral look with Fuji paper. Some people might not have noticed the cast but I did. It depends on what you want to settle for.

    Fuji paper did seem to be less forgiving than Kodak. No problem probably with a minilab's instrumentation but for a home user with filters only it might prove problematical, based on my experience.

    pentaxuser

  6. #26
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Taylor View Post
    I haven't seen the need to calibrate the station. Instead it is the station that is used to identify a color cast on the print and, if one exists, then a quick flick of a viewing filter will indicate the filtration to remove that cast. Once a cast is removed will it reappear under tungsten?

    Except for the brightness range of various lighting sources making it easier or harder to see a print, I haven't noticed any difference is prints balanced by a balanced fluorescent bulb regardless of where it was hung.
    Once again, you can use your eyes. If you can't see a color cast, there isn't one. That is unless you're color blind in which case color printing may not be for you.

    There's a slight variation (very minor) between viewing outside/by window light and by tungsten. Just make sure the print "looks good" under similar conditions to what you will be displaying it.

    Ciba filters usually only go down to 5cc which is a problem some of the time, but not others. A dichro enlarger is better. Most color negative printing filters include a 2.5 CC, which is much less of a problem.
    --Nicholas Andre

  7. #27

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    Thanks to all who replied. I've taken the plunge, purchased the head, paper, and chems. I went with the Arista 2-bath kit, and Kodak Endura. I hope I can pull this off. My darkroom isn't very warm so I'll probably need to keep the trays in a water bath. I don't know if my bath is big enough for both trays, but as I understand it, the developer is the critical part. I didn't buy a safelight as even Kodak remarks they WILL affect your results. I'll work in as dark as I can get it.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  8. #28
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    Don't know about the Arista developer, but I'm using the Ektacolor RA RT stuff down to around 62-64f without a water bath and my preliminary results have been good. I'm using NO developer starter.

    This is with the cheap Kodak Edge roll paper.

    As long as your chemical/paper combo can handle the reduced temps you won't have problems. RA4 is quite easy.

    Regarding safelights. The Edge paper says the same thing, (don't use one and it will effect color balance before fogging is evident) but in my initial printing sessions I have had good results using the color filter setting on a Jobo Maxilux safelight. This is an led safelight that I aim onto a wall between the enlarger and trays.

    I know when I used Endura I always did my printing in complete darkness and had access to a tabletop RA4 processor but if you have the correct safelight I'd test it.

  9. #29

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    Just printed my first print the other day, took a couple of hours but turned out nicely. Thanks a lot to Ian C and tiberiustibz for helping me out and taking the time to reply to my PMs offering advice.
    To anyone looking to try it, go for it! It is really simple, and the results are very nice.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    That is unless you're color blind in which case color printing may not be for you.
    I found this hilarious.

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