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  1. #1
    david b's Avatar
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    I've never really shot E6 film outside (or even inside) and will be going to Arches National Park in UT in a few weeks. I normally shoot medium format black and white.

    Can someone recommend a film for me?

    thanks....

  2. #2

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    In my opinion here are the necessities for red sand stone pichurs(Beware these will be pretty pictures and you will most likely be shooting oft duplicated scenes)But who the hell cares right? I love the area.

    Film-Provia 100 F. I think the colors are more realistic
    E100S or SW was nifty too but I have no idea what the G films will do.

    Velvia is too saturated and totally unrealistic, in my opinion, but that is the film most calendar shots are made on.

    Get a polarizor and a warming filter or a combination of the two. I love my Moose warming polarizor

    Carry water water and more water. have patience and wait for the light. Morning light has less haze and evening light is special because of it.

    Have fun
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  3. #3

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    For colour landcape I use Fuji Velvia 50 and Kodak E100VS, as Mark stated they are very saturated films (VS is for Vivid Saturation) but I like the results, expecially in the Colorado Plateau, and I don't find the colour so unrealistic, but it's a matter of taste )))...
    On the other hand I don't like Provia, it seems to me that lacks "personality"...
    A lot of people are satisfied with Velvia 100, some say that it covers a territory between Velvia 50 and Provia 100, but I never tried it so I can't articulate about that...

  4. #4
    b.e.wilson's Avatar
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    I use Velvia there, as there isn't any "correct" color for the sandstone; it changes too much during the course of the day to be correct. I show some examples of this change in my Fisher Towers article: http://wilson.dynu.net/fisher.asp

  5. #5

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    Hello, Remember that contrast ranges are very wide there. I would use Fuji Astia in the higher contrast situations to capture more of the full range. I am not much of a Velveeta fan so take that into consideration. Try to take a walk up courthouse wash with bare feet, it is great, but do use suntan lotionon the top of your feet. Have fun, Ken

  6. #6
    gma
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    I used my first Fuji Velvia 50 in bright sunlight and I am favorably impressed with the color saturation and extremely fine grain. The shadows are not bluish and the greens are very rich and true. For high contrast subjects it probably is not a good choice, however. Fuji Astia has lower contrast, but acceptable color rendition.

  7. #7

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    If you have two bodies, or can change rolls with time of day, you should probably take a high-contast film (Velveeta, etc) for midday or in the shadows, and a softer negative film for early/late in the day. I shot some Velvia in 120 last time I was there, and while the chromes are beautiful, the shadows just drop off a cliff late in the day; i.e. if my highlights still have detail, the shadows are black and unrecoverable. Works well when they don't dominate the image, less well so on people or large areas. On the other hand, I have some sandstone in open shade pictures, and the Velvia gently pulled the various reds in the rock apart, revealing them all in their personal glory.

    Good luck, this time of year. Light is nice, but it's getting warm.

  8. #8
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    Tom Till, who has a gallery in Moab apparently uses Kodak E100VS. You need to stop by his gallery and check it out. Absolutely wonderful. My personal preference is for tmax 100. However, when I'm wandering te Colorado Plateau I often carry some velvia 50. Unfortunately, I don't feel I know any of te E6 films well enough to use them. Good luck. Have a great trip.

    BTW: On a side note I highly recommend a visit to the castelton towers area east of Moab. It's a beautiful place and only about 30 minutes from Arches/Moab.



 

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