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  1. #1
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    Nikon F4S for slides??

    I have a Nikon F3Hp, and on the way a Nikon F4S. There are 5 rolls of Velvia 100 in the freezer.

    My latest whim is to shoot a series of images on slide film. My problem is I haven't shot much slide film since the days of Kodachrome and I'm a little out of touch. I like my images a bit on the saturated side.

    I'm sure if I bracketed and metered correctly I'd do pretty good with exposures but I'm wondering if their mightn't be someone out there with a suggestion or two. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    I shot about a dozen rolls of Kodachrome last summer on my F4s...perfect. It's got a terrific metering system and if you use a bit of common sense (and maybe bracketing or specific meter reading) on the tough lighting scenarios you'll be fine.

    On the vast majority of situations I encountered, I shot either Aperture priority or else on manual after using the camera's meter suggestion. If you're asking if the F4s is a camera you can trust, the answer is 'yes'. BTW the matrix metering works on older manual focus lenses on the F4

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    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Trust in the matrix meter. I even shot Kodachrome 64 with an Olympus Trip 35 point and shoot and it came out great. Meters are very good at what they do.
    --Nicholas Andre

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    The F4 has one of the best, if not THE best, meters Nikon's ever put in a camera - slides would not be an issue. I can always tell neg sheets from my F4, as they're the only ones properly exposed on all frames

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    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Shoot your transparencies at the ISO film speed, at the exposure recommended by a hand-held incident light meter, using an accurate shutter and diaphragm, with knowledge of your lens' t stops, and your slides will be exposed perfectly (if normal exposure is what you want). Minus the t stops ('cause who the hell does that anyhow?), and you will be close enough. I don't care what kind of fancy in-camera meter the camera has. You will always get the more normal exposure going with what a hand held incident meter tells you what to do.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Shoot your transparencies at the ISO film speed, at the exposure recommended by a hand-held incident light meter, using an accurate shutter and diaphragm, with knowledge of your lens' t stops, and your slides will be exposed perfectly (if normal exposure is what you want). Minus the t stops ('cause who the hell does that anyhow?), and you will be close enough. I don't care what kind of fancy in-camera meter the camera has. You will always get the more normal exposure going with what a hand held incident meter tells you what to do.
    I've done this, in the past, with my Leica M stuff using my old Sekonic. I could get the exposures pretty much the way I like them, a tad saturated by underexposing 1/3 or 1/2 stop. This is the way I used to do it with transparency film. That was a while ago.

    Now I'm taking more pictures of distant subjects with medium and long telephotos so I'll need to depend on the matrix metering.

  7. #7
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Hi Paul, Velvia100 is well saturated for colour and is accurately rated at 100 ISO on all my light meters, and I find no reason to uprate it to improve the density, I hope you like it as much as I do, I love the colours, and the sharpness that this film produces.
    Ben

  8. #8
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Shoot your transparencies at the ISO film speed, at the exposure recommended by a hand-held incident light meter, using an accurate shutter and diaphragm, with knowledge of your lens' t stops, and your slides will be exposed perfectly (if normal exposure is what you want). Minus the t stops ('cause who the hell does that anyhow?), and you will be close enough. I don't care what kind of fancy in-camera meter the camera has. You will always get the more normal exposure going with what a hand held incident meter tells you what to do.
    We use t-stops in motion picture.

    You wont always get a 'normal' exposure from an incident meter, just 'correct' exposure for 18% grey under the given light, which can be a problem if youre shading part of the dome from the measured light, or measuring the shade, or away from the light source etc.

    Incident meters blow hard for landscapes when you have to contend with the sky and other far away objects that put out a greater amount of light than the location you are shooting from.

  9. #9
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    As rlandrigan said, my F4 also has recognizable neg sleeves because they are always correctly exposed. The meter is fantastic to use in all modes and is far less finicky than the semi-spot 80/20 meter of the F3. I use an F3 as well myself, and it's another of my favorite bodies, but the F4 undoubtedly has the better meter by a good margin.

  10. #10
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    These posts have given me exactly what I want to hear.

    It would have been more sensible to have asked this before the purchase of the F4S but I saw the thing for a pretty good "buy it now" so I had to jump in.

    If I remember I'll give a update after I've shot a roll or two.

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